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  • #45633

    Astsaturova
    Participant

     
     
    Thank you all for your helpful responses.
    First let me explain a little bit about our company’s area of work. We are Yellow Page
    Designer Company  (including Spec Pac, Smart Pac, and Sales Pac). It’s a medium-sized company with almost 80 employees.
     
    Rahil,
     Thanks for your useful explanation.
     
    In answer to QualityColorado I should say:
    1-leaning six sigma in our company was a decision made by top management. Although there are different view points between managers on whether we should apply it or not, we are going to do that.
    2-Some of them say it’s like other Quality Management System some say it’s more efficient. But I think it’s just a “flavor of the week as you mentioned” from decision maker.
    3- This is the first time that someone is being appointed the deployment “champion” for six sigma  in our company.
    Thank you for your time.
     
    BritW,
    I guess I answered your question at the beginning. Thank you too for your help offer (which I really need).
     
    Mike,
    1-Would you please elaborate on “basic tools” in your statement?
    2-Why I’m trying to figure out a short cut is because my boss always has brilliant ideas but most of them are not feasible and I’m not sure if even we need to apply six sigma  in our company. When he told me about six sigma, I read about it and I thought may be there’s a short cut to reach the result as soon as possible without spending that much time and money ( I had this experience before in my last job I was in charge of  ISO 9000:2001 implementation. it was absolutely worthless.  I strongly believe that it is just wasting time, money, and effort). Thank you for your useful hints.
     
    RFC,
    Thanks for your response. (I just don’t know if you mean Mike Carnell?)
     
    Steve,
    Thanks a lot for your time to answer my questions and help me on this matter. I have nothing to say. I am just confused after reading your mail. Let me think about it.
    Do you really think other Quality Management System Programs are better compare to Six Sigma?
     
    Best Regards,
    Kate

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    #149527

    Eric Maass
    Participant

    Kate,
    Your responses are well thought-out, and I think you are quite an asset to your company.Regarding your plan-of-attack, I would suggest that perhaps you take a step back and think about the possibility that you could align this assignment so that it helps the company improve in the ways that you and others feel the company needs to improve.I would suggest that you spend some time thinking about this yourself, and perhaps brainstorm with a few people who have been with the company for awhile.Then, after you have a list of ideas on what needs to improve, and perhaps organize them a bit so that you see the “big picture”, then perhaps you can decide what approach might be best – so that whatever improvement plan you pursue, it is not a “flavor of the month”, but a deployment plan for something that helps your company.
    Best regards and best of luck,Eric

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    #149534

    Marlon Brando
    Participant

    Kate
    I will  be  glad  to  help  you also.I’m  ready  to  send  you a  Comprehensive  PPT about  Change  Management for  free(as  a  New  Year  Gift )?What  is  your  Email? 

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    #149538

    Ashman
    Member

    Do you really think other Quality Management System Programs are better compare to Six Sigma?
    Absolutely.  Six sigma has undoubtedly set quality backwards by 20 years. 
    A great example appears in the current issue of Fast Company, where the continuous improvement approach to quality at Toyota is compared to the American car manufacturers’ six sigma approach.  It is no wonder that Toyota has outstripped its competitors. 
    It is interesting to also compare the Toyota story with the Ford Edge story where Ford’s 10,000 black belts were unable to fix 70 manufacturing faults and outside help had to be called in.

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    #149540

    Pai
    Participant

    Steve,
    Do you recommend lean in place of six sigma methodology.?..I know about the gains of implementing lean , especially looking at the benefits taken by Japanese organisations …but I still dont understand the prescriptive approach of lean…which tools we have to use first ..what is the sequence of this methodology as compared to a very prescriptive DMAIC approach..is it possible for you to help me understand the lean approach by giving some references , case studies ..or projects wherein I can understand the rigour of implementing lean..
    thanks
    Rajesh

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    #149542

    Saidane
    Participant

    Hi Kate,
    I’m about preparing my first SixSigma project. The project will focus on reducing delivery delays in a garment manufacturer. This was my idea to introduce SixSigma, and decisions should be taken from business leaders.
    I read Steve answers, however, I think that Six Sigma is not a set of statistical tools, it’s a mangement program and a methodology to solve problems.
    Happy new year, Best Wishes!

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    #149546

    Six Sigma Shooter
    Member

    And thus we get to the core of the problem with today’s “improvement” methodologies.  They are too prescriptive.  When Toyoda went to Ford and learned from ole Henry, all that Henry prescribed was the continual improvement of processes.  Toyoda learned, adapted, applied and improved for his situation and that of Toyota. 
    When Deming went to Japan, he did not prescribe a methodology but a midset of continual improvement.  Stop looking to case studies and rigid methodolgies and start learning and THINKING!  Then you might get somewhere with your continual imrprovement efforts.  Cookbook approaches, following case studies and “best practices” as applied by others will not get you there.  Follow what Toyoda did – learn, adapt, apply and improve.  As Deming would say, “Off we go to the Milky Way” is what happens when you just want to follow the “steps” as developed by someone else.

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    #149550

    Mike Carnell
    Participant

    Kate,
    There are some basic tools that can be used for Change Management. It sounds like you don’t understand the basics. Start out with a book by Kaplan “Leading Change” and then get the book from Tom Devane “Integrating Lean Six Sigma and High-Performance Organizations” for some more specific information.
    There are plenty of books on Program Management that will explain setting objectives, milestones, metrics, program reviews, schedules, etc. You need to understand what you were asked to do and that is to deploy Six Sigma basically the same thing you were asked to do with ISO. If you did it with ISO and you do not understand Change Management and Program Management and you never saw the value in ISO then you are probably the wrong person to do this as well. A deployment is more than a bunch of people doing projects. It is system level thinking and understanding where and how you fit into the organization.
    If you do believe it is the “flavor of the week” as you mentioned then you need to step up and tell your management that is what you think they are doing. If you do not do that they you are complicit in the waste of company resources and probably guilty of malicious obedience which maybe the true cause of failure rather than the Leadership teams “flavor of the day.”
    You seem to have rationalized the search for a shortcut. You are searching for a shortcut in something you do not understand so basically you are willing to make an uninformed decision that doesn’t put you at risk but it does put the organization at risk. The fact that you are looking at cost rather than benefit i.e. ROI, means you have a fairly truncated view of cost and will be lead the way that type of thinking typically goes and that is buy the cheap one and wonder why you got poor results. You get what you pay for and you frequently you get what you don’t pay for. If you did not undersatand the value of a management system like ISO and never figutred out how to make it create value for you then that is your issue not the ISO issue.
    My honest opion here is that from the statements you have made you are the wrong person to lead any type of change. You lack knowledge and understanding at even the operational level let alone the strategic level. You have no intuitive understanding of system level thinking and for some reason believe you are capable. Give your organization a chance to improve and hand this over to someone who is not jaded and self absorbed.
    Just my opinion.
    Good luck

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    #149551

    qualitycolorado
    Participant

    Kate,
    Mike Carnell’s advice is very sound (as always).
    In addition to the Change Management resources that Mike noted, here are a few others worth considering:
    Books: “Leading Change”, “The Heart of Change”, and “The Heart of Change Field Guide” (first 2 by John Kotter, last one by Dan Cohen) — all of these will help, regarding of the methodology you are using for process / quality improvement.  The “Field Guide” has some templates and diagnostics that may be very useful to someone in your position (in the middle of the organization, trying to influence upward, and engage downward).
    On-line tutorials:  Try the “Change Management Learning Center”, by Prosci — several basic (free) tutorials here:
    http://www.change-management.com/tutorials.htm
    Webinars:  Prosci also sponsors a very good (and free) change management webinar series, though the next series will not start for another month or so:
    http://www.change-management.com/webinars.htm
     
    … hope this is helpful ….
     
    Best regards,
    QualityColorado

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    #149553

    BritW
    Participant

    You will find varying views (as you might have seen) from the responders.  Since you are going to implement Six Sigma, I would suggest you work toward makig it a success rather than proporting its failures.  You will see people mention Ford and others, but the fact is no one, not even Steve can attach Ford’s failings to only Six Sigma. I really like listening to his posts, but very one sided. You could give similar examples of TQM, lean, et al. failures.  In Ford’s case, I attribute much of their misfortunes on management ability.
    The metholodology has been around for 20+ years and the tools have been around longer, so the flavor of the month idea is a bit off.  But if the CEO heard it at a conference and now wants to do it, I would suggest taking advantage and making it your own.  The post by Marlon was a good one – don’t be limited to a cookbook methodology. I like using the DMAIC structure for projects, but use as many tools as are applicale from the various thoughts out there.
    I would caution against a shortcut – you want results fast, and that’s admirable, however you may well skip over real causes for problems.  You can use the Kaizen Event method from lean for quick-solve issues.  I would, however, keep the DMAIC steps in place, even in a shortened event like Kaizen (in this case the Define and Measures are usually done before the event).  The problem with Kaizen is that if you do not have full management support (and you said some were not sold), then pulling a team off the floor for 3-5 days in a row might be a problem.  The teaming approach supported by TQM and Six Sigma might be a better route – takes longer, but results may be better.  That being said – not every project needs a six sigma team.  If you have a BFO (blindig flash of the obvious) and know what the improvement is, do it!
    I don’t feel Six Sigma is necessarily more efficient as you mentioned in your post.  It is more structured.  Another “famous” structure was/is FOCUS – PDCA from the TQM days. I’m not a big fan of PDCA because it lends itself to trial and error problem solving instead of getting the right change in place as quickly as it is identified.
    Regardless of the route you choose, I submit this – learn about the different methodologies and take the best from all – in particular, six sigma, lean and TOC.  If you go off and get trained (and I suggest someone does) in Six Sigma, look for someone who trains lean six sigma.  I have found DMAIC to work for our organization, but I use many of the tools from others and not all from Six Sigma.
    Lastly – you need a strategic direction, meaning projects chosen based on the strategic needs of the organization.  Without it, you might as well do local optimization projects like in TQM.  Other tools that may help from the overall implementation standpoint are the Balanced Scorecard and GE’s Change Acceleration Process.
    Good luck and keep posting

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    #149557

    Mike Carnell
    Participant

    QualityColorado,
    I like the links. Thank you.
    Regards

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    #149556

    Marlon Brando
    Participant

    Kate
    You  seem  to  be  a  lucky person,as  every expert  is  trying  to give you  an  honest advice.Good  Luck

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    #149984

    Astsaturova
    Participant

    Hi Marlon,
    I really appreciate your support and help offered in this matter. Sorry to answer you late. My e-mail is [email protected] .
    Thanks again and Happy New Year.
    Regards,
    Kate
     
     
     

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    #150040

    Marlon Brando
    Participant

    Kate
    Have sent it,expect  tp  receive  your  feedback and  comments,
    best  regards 

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    #150042

    Ashman
    Member

    Rajesh,
    No.  My recommendation is to do what the Japanese have been doing all along … go back to what Deming taught. 
    No wonder the little blighters have been so successful in overtaking US companies !

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    #150299

    Astsaturova
    Participant

    Hi Mike,
    Thank you for your helpful and honest advice and also for the books you introduced. I’ve been using your good hints and some other’s hints like Marlon’s, BritW,… and started learning about SS methodology as well. To be honest, the more I learn about it, the more I realize its benefits.
    I started with modeling our business process (organization’s workflow using iGrafx software), and then I extracted different types of reports from database indicating the current performance. I defined some targets (I guess defining goals and objectives is management’s responsibility but as I knew about it by experience, I just defined them though they’re not approved yet), and finally I provided a list of people who should be involved with definition of their responsibilities and a short description of MBB, BB, GB, and YB (since nobody knows about six sigma, I have to explain that it’s a team work and everybody is involved and also explain that what these belts indicate).
    I’d really appreciate it if you could help me in this matter and tell me whether I’m in the right path or I need to start in other way.
    Thank you so much in advance.
     
    Best Regards,
    Kate

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