iSixSigma

Six Sigma Headcount

Six Sigma – iSixSigma Forums Old Forums General Six Sigma Headcount

Viewing 32 posts - 1 through 32 (of 32 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #38763

    Ron
    Member

    I am looking for benchmark data on companies utilizing the six sigma methodology.
    What are companies experience regarding the number of greenbelts and blackbelts as a percentage of total employee population?

    0
    #116498

    Heebeegeebee BB
    Participant

    BB’s 1% +/-
    GB’s -the other 99% +/-

    0
    #116533

    Adam Bowden
    Participant

    Cute reply ol buddy.
    Best regards,
    Adam

    0
    #116556

    McD
    Participant

    I know of one large company trying to stay at 3% Black, and it’s a bit of a struggle.  Heeb’s right, though, everyone else should be a GB.  In this same company, the CEO and his staff all certified as GB’s early on in the program, and yes, they did have to do a project to get certified.  Of course, that meant the next layer down got the message quickly, too.
    –McD
     

    0
    #116631

    Ron
    Member

    Thanks for the forthright answer! Seems we have many “jokers” on this website that respond for comic value only!

    0
    #116633

    Heebeegeebee BB
    Participant

    Except that I wasn’t kidding…

    0
    #116670

    TAD
    Member

    I recently developed an implementation plan for Lean/Six Sigma within a service organization and did quite a bit of research and benchmarking in regards to staffing levels.
    When looking at staffing, I had to remove those companies that require BB or GB training for advancement.  For example, using percentages from GE would be useless.
    I found that the recommended BB levels range from 1% to 3%.  The number of GB are recommended in the 10%-15% range.  We are using Yellow Belt training as the training for the rest of the associates within the company.
    One good piece of advice that I was given along the way is to think “backward” in this process.  How many implementation can your company support?  If each GB is completing 2 projects/year and each BB four/year, in a company of 1000 that is in the range of 250 project/year.  That is alot of change for an organization new to Six Sigma.
    Hope this helps!

    0
    #116733

    Dog Sxxt
    Participant

    Ideally everyone in the company shall be a black belt. Why not?

    0
    #116743

    Ken Feldman
    Participant

    Because most people don’t have the IQ to even become a good Green Belt.

    0
    #116744

    Ken Feldman
    Participant

    Wow, the new mental telepathy machine is working.  I was able to post while at dinner.  I wish I was smart enough to have thought of that witty response.  Thanks to whomever has posted on my behalf.

    0
    #116754

    Dog Sxxt
    Participant

    Ironically this six sigma forum cannot even have a foolproof ID checking system. I do not why it’s so difficult to limit an ID to a its registered user.

    0
    #116761

    Ron
    Member

    Thanks for an intelligent response! They are sometimes hard to come by here.
     
     

    0
    #116780

    Mike Carnell
    Participant

    TAD,
    Your research may have shown that people are at a 10-15% range (I assume that was using data on successful deployments?) on Green Belts. Most change management reseach gives a number around 30% to get a culture shift. The GB’s are where the culture shift comes from. You will be to light on the GB’s at 10-15%.
    I agree completely with the think backwards idea.
    Regards,
    Mike

    0
    #116782

    Anonymous
    Guest

    In my chemical / plastics manufacturing company, the roll-out target were 2.5% BB, 12.5% GB.  This worked for a year.  After three years the numbers are 0.8% active BB.  The GB trained population is 12% of the company but very few are actively supported, maybe 1-2%.

    0
    #116787

    Heebeegeebee BB
    Participant

    If genuine culture shift/change is the goal, 10%-15% won’t cut the mustard.   This is based on personal experience.
     

    0
    #116801

    McD
    Participant

    Mike
    That was my reaction, too, but he is talking about Yellow Belt training for everyone else, so at least they are getting everyone to drink the Kool-Aid.
    –McD
     

    0
    #116802

    McD
    Participant

    When looking at staffing, I had to remove those companies that require BB or GB training for advancement.
    I think this is an important part of getting the message across.  Once you need the training to get ahead, it gets higher on your priority list.  Of course, to some degree this depends on how much of the specifics of an individual’s training program is self directed as opposed to mandated.
    –McD
     

    0
    #116838

    Mike Carnell
    Participant

    John,
    I understand you can’t move straight to the 30% number and Yellow Belt is a good way to work on the inertia. My current deployment has 25,000 employees. If I needed to train 7,500 GB’s right away I would have a problem and my customer a bigger problem because they would be looking at implementing 15,000 projects and my BB’;s would need to mentor 300 GB’s each.
    My point was that regardless of the benchmark data the number of 10-12% will be to low, making the jump to 30% in a year is fatal. They need to understand what the targets need to be and how to get there.
    Another issue that seems to have slipped off the table with regards to the numbers is demographics. When we design a deployment locations make a huge amount of difference in how many – particularly BB’s.
    Regards

    0
    #116848

    McD
    Participant

    the number of 10-12% will be to low, making the jump to 30% in a year is fatal.
    Mike
    This is an excellent point that I probably glossed over.  Six Sigma is about culture change, and culture change doesn’t happen overnight, no matter how bad you wish it would be that way.  A deployment needs to have a plan and metrics, and that plan has to be realistic.  Anyone who thinks he can do it in a year might better be looking for a new line of work.

    Another issue that seems to have slipped off the table with regards to the numbers is demographics.
    Funny you should mention that, because that is something I did think about when I responded.  But I hadn’t given it enough thought, and what thoughts I had would likely lead to a flame war.  That is something I would love to talk about over a Guinness, though.
    –McD
     

    0
    #116860

    Sinnicks
    Participant

    I used to work for Raytheon, I don’t mind telling you the company name, they have always been very serious about their six sigma deployment and have even done work to devise an integration assessment(how well six sigma is integrating into the culture).
    When they started 1999, they had a goal of .5%BB; they call them Experts and 25% of the salaried workforce GB; they call them Specialists (industry equivelant of a yellow belt, but still required to complete a project for qualification).  As they moved forward the second year goal was 1% BB and still 25% GB but at an overall level to include hourly, but then it began to increase on the GB side every year after.  Today the BB is still at 1% and the GB qualification shows up on their performance screens for their annual review.  There is usually a financial savings, soft or hard that is tied to that as well.  As for having too many projects, Raytheon Six Sigma is actualy Lean Sigma and therefore the scope of the project of the GB/Specialist can be somewhat less than that of a traditional GB.  In a group of 500 it was not uncommon to have as many as 50 projects going at once at varying levels of complexity.
    If you are interested in more information I can give you a point of contact.  Raytheon is very interested in sharing knowledge especially when it comes to Six Sigma and I am sure someone would be glad to talk to you.

    0
    #116890

    Mike Carnell
    Participant

    John,
    I would love to have that discussion (and the beer). We don’t like to leave a belt isolated so if we have different locations we don’t use 1 belt – that leveling effect starts where the organization tries to pound them back into the mold. If there are multiple belts then they can keep each other motivated. As much as most don’t like it I like them colocated at least through training. We do get that “elitist” crap but if we didn’t have them colocated it is the same people who would complain about something else.
    Bottom line if the facilities are all in one spot – less belts. If they are spread out – more.
    Just my opinion.

    0
    #116901

    New VGB
    Participant

    Are you serious in this  statement?  thanks

    0
    #116902

    New VGB
    Participant

    Are you canceling the  role of the GB?

    0
    #116903

    Ken Feldman
    Participant

    Read my response to myself.  I didn’t post the slam against GBs.  Somebody highjacked my posting name.  Done often in this Forum.

    0
    #116907

    Hurst
    Participant

    It sounds like Raytheon is doing their part to dumb down Six Sigma for the masses. Do us a favor and don’t share that wonderful R6Sigma knowledge with us. DMAIC is just not good enough. Let’s rename the original five and throw in one more for good measure.

    0
    #116915

    Sinnicks
    Participant

    Whoaa! Easy boy……For clarities sake, the intent is not to dumb it down.  They don’t claim that their “Greenbelts” are the equivelant to industry standard, the intent is culture change and an understanding of the basic concepts “Yellow Belt”, additional advanced training is there for the taking if the employee and manager so desire.  Their “Blackbelts” undergo extensive training and have a substantial certification process.  So they renamed the steps…..And there is more then one company that remapped the model.  There is no Silver Bullet to continuous improvement and it takes more then a few “annointed” ones to make the improvements stick.

    0
    #116920

    Mikel
    Member

    It was always dumbed down – Six Sigma Light from Air Academy.

    0
    #116922

    SigmaLayer
    Member

    I am currently with an organization that is a leader in six sigma.  Until this past year, all employees in the organization were required to become GB certified within 1 year of employment.  GB Certification merely means that you can think on the same road path as those that are BBs and MBBs.  GB Certified employees help the BBs achieve the goals that they are striving for, although their main career is operational. That is why the percentages are so skewed.  You can say that a BB usually works with 3-4 GBs during a project and the number of BBs are dependant on the company size and growth/optimization efforts. 
    Hope that helps
    SigmaLayer
     
    Posted by: RonPosted on: Thursday, 17th March 2005, 1:11 PM

    I am looking for benchmark data on companies utilizing the six sigma methodology.
    What are companies experience regarding the number of greenbelts and blackbelts as a percentage of total employee population?

    0
    #116926

    McD
    Participant

    Interesting.  When you mentioned demography, I was thinking more along the lines of the sort of workers — training, type of job, etc. and the culture of the organization — us/them, leadership at all levels, etc.
    The geographic distribution never occurred to me.  Probably because I was trained at a shop with a very global presence, and a very good infrastructure for doing projects globally.  When I took my MBB training I mentored Belts on three continents, so I never saw the ocean as that big of a deal.  However, for the actual training sessions we did bring all the BBIT’s together in big waves so they could interact with each other.
    –McD
     

    0
    #116927

    Darth Real One
    Participant

    Fake Darth, please stop posting under my name.  Your comments do not reflect what I would have posted.  Webmaster, please track down this person’s ISP and ban him/her.

    0
    #116935

    Mike Carnell
    Participant

    John,
    WE had good connectivity at BHP so the demo graphics had less impact. Actually the Champion at Allied Signal Safety Restraints as far back as 1995 was good at using the video conferencing technology back then.
    Some work well on email but most I like to see what they are talking about when we are doing support sessions.
    My real concern is when you leave someone isolated particularly in Wave I where you run for a few months without significant movement and the company culture grinds on them. If there are two or more the grinding takes a little longer.
    Regards

    0
    #139271

    Journalist
    Participant

    Hi there,
    My name is Jonathan Richards and I’m a journalist with The Times of London.
    I noticed you made a posting on a message board recently about the experience of working at Raytheon.
    I’m doing a piece at the moment which touches on Raytheon at the moment and was hoping to speak to some former employees of the company.
    Do you have any idea how I might get in touch with any? Ideally they would have worked there pretty recently – certainly in the last 2-3 years – and know a little about its operations in Iraq.
    I’d be most grateful for any help.
    Kind Regards,
    Jonathan Richards
    Reporter, The Times
    +44 207 782 5303

    0
Viewing 32 posts - 1 through 32 (of 32 total)

The forum ‘General’ is closed to new topics and replies.