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Six Sigma Trivia

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  • #34656

    Tierradentro
    Participant

    To add some fun to our Green Belt training we plan to include ‘trivia’ questions throughout the course, with answers to be continuous data to enable use of some of the tools we are teaching. Six Sigma trivia seems to be hard to find, so I was looking for some trivia from the forum – have you any that you would like to share? But please, give the anser as well as the question!

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    #151367

    Martha DeLeon
    Participant

    Hello John – I am responsible for designing the content for our Lean Six Sigma website at work. I  was considering adding a trivia section and was searching for such when I saw your post. Any chance you could share just a few trivia questions for my intranet website? Thanks!

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    #151374

    Mikel
    Member

    What is the basis for the “Breakthrough Strategy” that is referred to in Six Sigma training?

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    #151389

    Raymond
    Participant

    “Breakthrough Strategy” in Six-Sigma is the disciplined approach towards rigorous data collection and analysis for attaining service improvement.

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    #151396

    Mikel
    Member

    Wrong. The term, as used in Six Sigma, was borrowed from a well known business guru who coined the term in 1964. Who coined the term?

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    #151398

    Darth
    Participant

    I know, Mikel Harry….he invented SS, the 1.5 shift, breakthrough strategy and the holy grail.  If it was borrowed from the Guru, I hope by now it has been returned.

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    #151399

    DaveS
    Participant

    JJ was coiner

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    #151407

    Mikel
    Member

    As expected, your flipant answer is not correct.
    The only thing attributable to your hero there is taking credit for everyone elses work. I am told that it is the result of behavior learned  in his rigorous PhD program, but I know to many PhD’s who don’t act like that to say that is the Red X (how do you like that? – I worked in a little Shainin speak to give tribute to one of the others who takes credit for the work of others)

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    #151408

    Mikel
    Member

    You sir, are correct.
    Now don’t tell anyone what that means. We want Darth to do his own homework today.

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    #151411

    Robert Butler
    Participant

    Here are a few for the statistics side of Six Sigma.
    1. What does beer have to do with the t-test?
    2. Who was Student and why did he have to use that name?
    3. What two men are credited with the quote “There are lies, damned lies, and statistics”?
    4. In experimental design we often refer to blocks, plots, and split plots.  What is the origin of these terms?
    5. For most of human history the study of probability was restricted to what field of human endeavor?
    6. Two men, one a professional gambler and blackguard, the other a mathematician who had sworn off math because he viewed it as a sexual indulgence, are often credited with the first formal mathematical treatment of a statistical question – who were these two men and what was the question?
    7. “Only the truly educated can be moved to tears by statistics.” This is the reply to what barb?  Who said it?
    8.  In Cpk – what does “pk” stand for?

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    #151412

    jmj
    Participant

    Born in Braila, Romania. Father was a shoemaker. At age 8 moved to Minneapolis, USA. 
    On what date was JJ born?
    And, what was the motivation for relocation?

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    #151413

    WSG
    Member

    #1&2 WSG
    “The t-test was developed by ———, a statistician employed at the Guiness brewery. However, because the brewery did not allow employees to publish their research, ——— work on the t-test appears under the name “Student” (and the t-test is sometimes referred to as “Student’s t-test.”) ——— was a chemist and was responsible for developing procedures for ensuring the similarity of batches of Guiness. The t-test was developed as a way of measuring how closely the yeast content of a particular batch of beer corresponded to the brewery’s standard.”

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    #151416

    Six Sigma Shooter
    Member

    I believe he is about 103 or 104 years old and still going.

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    #151414

    Mikel
    Member

    Very good. Add to that – what is his current age?

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    #151420

    BTDT
    Participant

    Q4 – I also see “treatments” in ANOVACheers, BTDT

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    #151417

    too easy
    Member

    Too easy… born Dec. 24, 1940… left to escape poverty and anti-Semitism.  
     
     
    What field did JJ get his doctorate in and from where?

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    #151418

    jmj
    Participant

    Correct on the latter, but wrong on the year!

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    #151419

    Six Sigma Shooter
    Member

    I believe he actually moved to the US when he was 12, or so the story goes.

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    #151421

    dyslexic statguy
    Participant

    Yep.  Sorry, a transposition of the 0 and 4 – a problem that’s plagued my dyslexic but otherwise effective statistical career.

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    #151423

    Iain Hastings
    Participant

    #3 – Benjamin Disraeli and MarkTwain
    #7 – George Bernard Shaw said it but I had no idea that it was in response to a barb. You have me intrigued here Robert – what was the barb?
     

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    #151424

    cpk
    Participant

    #8-Pizza Kitchen….California Pizza Kitchen! I’m hungry now.

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    #151429

    DaveS
    Participant

    Here are a few for the statistics side of Six Sigma.
    1. What does beer have to do with the t-test?
    Gossett, the developer a.k.a Student worked for Guinness Brewery
    2. Who was Student and why did he have to use that name?
    Guinness considered his (Gossett’s) work on small sample estimation a trade secret, so he published as Student (of Gauss)
    3. What two men are credited with the quote “There are lies, damned lies, and statistics”?
    Good answer before
    4. In experimental design we often refer to blocks, plots, and split plots.  What is the origin of these terms?
    Much of modern DOE was developed by Sir RA Fisher while working for the British agricultural station, where there truly were experiments on blocks, plots and subplots (of fields).
    5. For most of human history the study of probability was restricted to what field of human endeavor?
    Gambling
    6. Two men, one a professional gambler and blackguard, the other a mathematician who had sworn off math because he viewed it as a sexual indulgence, are often credited with the first formal mathematical treatment of a statistical question – who were these two men and what was the question?
    Would like to hear this. The math guy got off on math? Curio user and curio user!
    7. “Only the truly educated can be moved to tears by statistics.” This is the reply to what barb?  Who said it?
    Yeah, who was it! Is GP Shaw the right answer and what was that barb?
    8.  In Cpk – what does “pk” stand for?
    Never heard a good verified explanation of his. Opinions do vary.  Some say “process and a Japanese word beginning with k” , others attribute to an author in the ’80s that published papers on this. His name I believe started with K, but it escapes me.
     
     

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    #151432

    Iain Hastings
    Participant

    #6 – The gambler was the Chevalier de Mere (Antoine Gombaud) and the rather prudish mathematician was Pascal.
    The question related to finishing a game early – how to divide the winnings based on the current status and the chances of each player winning from that point.
    At least I think that is the answer. Robert?

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    #151487

    Robert Butler
    Participant

      I didn’t get a chance to look at this thread again until this morning. I’m impressed. I wasn’t expecting to see that much interest in the questions. Based on my sources a number of you got the right answers to various questions.
    1. The t-test was developed by Gosset while working for the Guinness Brewery.
    2. The t-test allowed for a drastic reduction in the number of samples needed for analysis. Since it provided a competitive advantage Guinness and since Gosset was known in the industry Guinness insisted on a pseudonym and the publication in an obscure journal.
    3. Twain and Disraeli
    4. Early design work was done at a British agriculture station where-as noted – they actually did experiments on blocks and plots of land.
    5. Gambling
    6. Chevalier De Mere, Blaise Pascal. My sources indicate the question was ” What is likelier: Rolling at least one six in four throws of a single die, or rolling at least one double six in 24 throws of a pair of dice?”
    7. Unfortunatly – there is a typo here – I meant to write “This is the statisticians reply to what barb?” – and the answer is to the comment in #3. The author was G.B. Shaw.
    8. It’s my understanding that “pk” is supposed to stand for “Process” and K is for the Japanese word “katayori” which means deviation or offset.  There was a nice thread on this issue on the forum awhile back.  The lead post is the following:
    https://www.isixsigma.com/forum/showmessage.asp?messageID=47302

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