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Statisical tools to reduce employee turnover

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  • #37722

    Kung Fu Joe
    Participant

    I am Director of Quality Systems at a major MRO avaition corporation, and a BB. I among other duties am now tasked with running a “Sigma Event” to reduce our outrageous attrition rate. I am look for statistical tools to use to quantify an reduce this. What suggestions would you have for me, if you can even apply 6Sigma to this issue.

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    #111586

    Mikel
    Member

    What is a sigma event?
     

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    #111587

    Kung Fu Joe
    Participant

    I’m sorry I should have elaborated. A “Sigma Event” is what my senior management describes as everything that can’t be fixed in an hour or by firing someone. I’m kidding about that. It’s how I describe projects.

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    #111588

    Adam L Bowden
    Participant

    Hey Stan,
    Event – where alot of people get together, eat alot and if you are lucky enough to plan well ahead they actually achieve something from it other than getting fat.  Alot of people drive Kaizen events and achieve great results in a short amount of time – events that are not well plannes are known as Piezens – i.e alot of Pie to eat followed by a lot of hot air – or is that gas ?
    Regards,
    Adam

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    #111594

    Thomas C. Trible
    Member

    Kung Fu Joe:
     
    Have you or your bosses considered cutting to the chase and changing the corporate culture? Like instituting a Google culture, for example:
    Google’s world headquarters building is located in Mountain View, California, a stone’s throw from the Shoreline Regional Park wetlands. While not all Google offices around the globe are equally well-stocked, these are some of the essential elements that define a Google workspace:

    Lobby Décor – Piano, lava lamps, and live projection of current search queries from around the world.

    Hallway Décor – Bicycles and large rubber exercise balls on the floors, press clippings from around the world posted on bulletin boards everywhere. Many Googlers standing around discussing arcane IP addressing issues and how to build a better spam filter.

    Googler Offices – Googlers work in high density clusters remarkably reflective of our server setup, with three or four staffers sharing spaces with couches and dogs. This improves information flow and saves on heating bills.

    Equipment – Most Googlers have high powered Linux OS workstations on their desktops. In Google’s earliest days, desks were wooden doors mounted on two sawhorses. Some of these are still in use within the engineering group.

    Recreation Facilities – Workout room with weights and rowing machine, locker rooms, washers and dryers, massage room, assorted video games, Foosball, baby grand piano, pool table, ping pong, roller hockey twice a week in the parking lot.

    Google Café – Healthy lunches and dinners for all staff. Stations include “Charlie’s Grill,” “Back to Albuquerque,” “East Meets West” and “Vegheads.” Outdoor seating for sunshine daydreaming.

    Snack Rooms – Bins packed with various cereals, gummi bears, M&Ms, toffee, licorice, cashew nuts, yogurt, carrots, fresh fruit and other snacks. Dozens of different drinks including fresh juice, soda and make-your-own cappuccino.

    Coolest stop on the tour – A three-dimensional rotating image of the world on permanent display on a large flat panel monitor in the office of the engineer who created it. What makes it special is the toggle switch that allows you to view points of light representing real time searches rising from the surface of the globe toward space, color coded by language. Toggle and you can see traffic patterns for the entire Internet. Worth a trip to the second floor.

    Nearest 24 hour doughnut shop – Krispy Kreme, Mountain View, CA.
     

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    #111597

    Marshall
    Participant

    Kung Fu Joe,
    I was on a project about a year and a half ago that looked at employee satisfaction.  This may seem rather simple but we raised it by using survey data, mainly free text comments, affinity diagrams, QFDs and process maps. 
    Employee satisfaction (this is what breeds retention) is just like any other Y.  It is just softer and not as easy to put hard numbers around.  You can still use a lot of soft data tools like fishbones, C&E matixes, affinity diagrams and other ones that harness the employee voice.  It is a little scary to people who like hard data tools like DOE and regression, but it can still be addressed using Six Sigma tools.
    Marshall

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    #111609

    Marc Thys
    Participant

    Exit interviews would be a good place to start (if you had them). If you don’t, maybe you can do a survey of people that have left. Use affinity diagramming to come up with the main categories of “reasons for leaving”. Pareto them. Do an Ishikawa. Do a Why-because on the main categories.
    Maybe you can do a run chart to detect patterns over time in the attrition rate. Maybe you can correllate these to other patterns (overtime? workload?).
    Try stratifying the attrition rates over things like shifts, departments, supervisors, job functions, etc etc. Anything peculiar?
    I guess what I am saying is – don’t worry about the stats too much at this stage. Rather, ask the question “what is the data telling me?”. Stats come later.

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