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Takt time conterpart is ________?

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  • #44744

    Steck
    Member

    Takt time is the beat of the process to meet customer demand so what is its real life counterpart?  In other words, what is the natural beat of the process called? 
    Let’s assume cycle time is the time required to produce one unit from start to finish, thus the answer is not cycle time as I have defined it.
    I’m expecting lots of variation on this on…………..

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    #143980

    tottow
    Member

    Okay, I’ll be first in line to get bashed!
    You said;
    “Let’s assume cycle time is the time required to produce one unit from start to finish, thus the answer is not cycle time as I have defined it”.
    Why not?  I do not see how you have limited cycle time from being your answer by your definition.
    Not trying to be argumentative, I am just not sure I understand the logic of your statement.
    Also, why do you want to know?  What purpose will the answer serve?

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    #143993

    EdG
    Participant

    First Takt Time.  This is nothing more than the available production time divided by the customer’s demand.  It is the pace at which the process must run in order to meet the customer’s needs.  Understand that just because management (or even the operators) knows what this is doesn’t mean that the process is capable of functioning at this pace, something that we or at least some of my management occasionally forgets.
     
    Now Cycle Time.  If you reference the Lean Enterprise Institute you will find that they define cycle time as how often a part or product is actually completed by a process, as timed by observation.  I describe this to my management as the actual pace of our process.
     
    So, where Takt Time is the requirement as defined by our customer it is the goal that we must achieve in order to meet our customer’s needs.  Cycle time on the other hand it what the process is really operating at.  If Cycle time is at or below Takt time, then the process is capable of performing at the pace necessary to meet the customer’s needs.  If Cycle time is greater than Takt time, then the process is currently not capable of meeting our customer’s need and must be modified if we wish to be able to meet our customer’s needs.
     
    BTW, the time required to produce one unit from start to finish is known as Production Lead Time (or just lead time).  We use the term turn-around-time, but we are talking about the same quantity.  Additionally if you utilize Little’s Law you can relate takt / cycle time, work in process (units in process) and lead time. 
     Hope I got an “A”…  or at least a passing grade…

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    #143997

    Orang_Utan
    Participant

    VOC – takt time
    VOP – cycle timeYou hit it right, non-IE always confuse lead time with cycle time.

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    #144278

    sathish chandran
    Member

    Takt time is nothing but the ratio of asking rate of a customer to the available time to produce the product.
    The purpose of the takt time is to know the speed at which you need to produce a product to meet customer’s requirement.
    Takt – means speed.
    with regards
    sathish

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    #144279

    Swaggerty
    Participant

    Hi,
    TAKT Time can also be referred to as AHT. Which would mean the average time taken for producing an unit.
    In a typical ITES industry TAKT time would refer to Total time to produce N units / N.
    Hope this Helps!
    Any counter arguements?
    Regards,
    George

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    #144284

    Sea
    Participant

    George.
    no, no, no, no, no.
    TAKT time is the rate of demand of the customer it has nothing to do with your capability to produce at this rate.
    read EdG’s response I’d give him an A for his response.

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    #144325

    Jonathon
    Participant

    As others have said, takt time is an idealized “drumbeat” of how often a finished item should come off the line. One can measure how the actual delivery rate varies from that time, although things get a bit messy if the line remains batch-oriented.The actual time that a unit is in the production line can be expressed as: (Takt time) x (# of Stations) + (Waste)Waste includes queues, rework, transport, etc. The ideal line has balanced the work so that every station operates nearly exactly at takt time, and uses one-piece flow (true knaban).I hope this didn’t muddy the waters.PS: I’d like to pose a question here. Is it wasteful to operate faster than takt time, and to reduce the needed operating hours? What are others’ thoughts on that?

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    #144329

    arturo osuna
    Participant

    Running faster than T.T is goin to create iventory, need of handle it, need of warehouse, etc.
    But , all that  need to be compared against theconsumption of  resources  (cost) such as electricity, manpower (full time or partial), Review  the convenience of have this resources availabe as faster as possible in order to utilize them in other areas.

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    #144332

    Brit
    Participant

    NOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!

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    #144334

    EdG
    Participant

    There are a few problems with your equation.
    1.  Takt time is what the process needs to operate at, but it is NOT necessarily what the process is operating at.  So, I assume that you have made the assumption that the process is capable of performing at takt time.  Correct???
    2.  Takt time is measured in time per unit.  # of Stations might be unit IF there is one piece per station.  And, waste is measured in???  Time, units, what?
    I assume that you are attempting to apply Little’s Law.  That the total time for a process (Lead Time) is proportional to the average completion rate and the number of units in flow.
    Lead Time = (Average Completion Rate) x (Units in Process)
    Where,
    ·        Average Completion Rate would be the cycle time of a balanced process (each phase in the process is accomplishing equal work content)
    ·        Units in Process would be the total Work in Process (WIP)
    ·        Hence, Lead time is the actual time that a unit is in the production line
    I hope that this helps.
     

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    #144366

    Jonathon
    Participant

    I think you and I agree more than not, but I did leave out my assumptions. Shame on me for that omission.I assumed single piece flow of work through a series of reasonably load-leveled stations. If the process has batches, queues, and non-level loads, the equation becomes more complex. Also, the total process becomes slower, and variatioin about the “ideal” takt time gets worse.I also assumed that takt time is based on demand, although I was remiss in not mentioning that explicitly. (I did pose the question: if we attain the ability to deliver product faster than takt time, is it a good or bad idea to do so?)Finally, I assumed that waste manifests itself as additional processing time, although by no means is time the sole measure of waste.I do like using Little’s Law, with the caveat that “average” completion rate does not tell us about variation in completion rates. That’s where data analysis complements Lean, because patterns of variation can yield useful process information.

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    #144406

    EdG
    Participant

    An answer to your question: if we attain the ability to deliver product faster than takt time, is it a good or bad idea to do so?
    It Depends…
    If you have the capability to deliver product faster than takt time, I would offer that this is an indication that you possess greater capacity than you currently need.  If you can gain greater customer demand then this is a good thing because you can easily accommodate.  However, if you cannot develop in increase in demand then you are probably wasting resources ($, manpower, something) and this would be a bad thing.
    If you are delivering items at a faster rate than takt time AND demand is not their, then you are filling a warehouse somewhere.  And that is a waste.  Unless you foresee an increase in demand due to periodic surges (such as holiday shopping) but then you are taking a gamble.  If that is the case then there is only one question left, do you feel lucky???
     Hope that this helps…

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    #144497

    Jonathon
    Participant

    Clearly, filling a warehouse with un-needed product is blatant Muda. The part with which I struggle is whether it’s wasteful to spend, say, 10 hours making product, if we can find ways to deliver it in 8. If we can increase demand, all is well. If not, should we operate fewer hours per day? Reduce staff through attrition?Thanks for your thoughts.

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    #144508

    EdG
    Participant

    I would offer, if you work a 10 hr shift and can deliver what is required in 8 hrs… then don’t you have an additional 2 hours for continuous improvement???  (Ignoring breaks, maintenance, changeover, etc.)
    If there is no need to maintain the additional capacity, then why not allow attrition to get yourself staffed to takt time?  Maintaining the staff and producing in 10 hours what can be produced in 8 hrs, is just as much muda as filling the warehouse.  Either way, you are wasting resources – material & human.
    Good luck…

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    #170608

    IE
    Participant

    My understanding is there is a “target takt time” (which is Customer Demand divided by Available Time) as well as an “actual takt time” which is how often a widget rolls off the end of the line.  Is this incorrect?
    It gets more cloudy when I’m looking at one machine in the line that has overlapping processes within itself(for instance it starts to infeed a new part as it outfeeds a finished part).  I define “cycle time” as the time it takes to complete a part from start to finish, but “actual takt time” as how often a finished parts comes off the machine.  Is that correct?
    Thanks

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    #170613

    George 4
    Participant

    No
    TT is correlated to the customer deman

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    #170697

    IE
    Participant

    So in my example: “a machine that has overlapping processes within itself(for instance it starts to infeed a new part as it outfeeds a finished part).”
    How do you define the time it takes to complete a part from start to finish?  How do you define how often a finished parts comes off the machine?
    Thanks
     

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    #170700

    RH
    Member

    Hi, could anyone explain me with example how to calculate the Takt Time for a software testing project …say interms of  test cases executed…

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