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The Value of Six Sigma Certification

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Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 15 total)
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  • #31636

    Schmidt
    Participant

    Hi All:  I am a seasoned MBB (GE-trained/certified) with a company that is very early in the Six Sigma journey.  We are in our second year and in the midst of developing a certification process for our Green Belts & Black Belts.  My question here, is simple.  What value does the company get out of having a group of certified Six Sigma professionals?  Does anyone have any data to prove or disprove that certified Six Sigma professional perform better than non-certified six sigma professionals?

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    #83633

    rullean
    Member

    Hello.  For me, I think the real value of Certification can boil down to morale.  Giving certifications can improve morale of blackbelts thus making them more productive.  It can also show how important this position is to other employees.  I am a blackbelt and I have experiences with my colleagues about having high or low morale.  I can really see the difference between the two.  Low morale blackbelts tend to have less initiative, only works when asked about updates, longer project completion (like even if a project can be finished by 2-3 months, they would end always in 4 months). 

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    #83634

    Andhale
    Participant

    Hello, In my opinion it is the knowledge which is more important than the certificate which a Black belt / Green belt gets after sucessful completion of the training. Certification is only a way to boost the morale of the person.Merely having a certificate will in no way help in improving the output.

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    #83635

    rullean
    Member

    But please keep in mind that they are still starting the deployment of Six Sigma in their company.  We have experienced this problem where people are questioning the “legality” and “longetivity” of this program.  Therefore, every ounce of morale boosting activity (like giving of certificates to certified blackbelts) really counts.  Just remember, low morale blackbelts tend to slow things down, than high morale blackbelts (assuming that both have the same skills and capabilities).  High morale BB’s can be more initiative, more resourceful, does not easily stop to barriers, can really battle unsupportive team members, etc…  This can really affect your operational income savings.  Anything that affects your savings affects your output (if you get what I mean).

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    #83638

    Mahi
    Participant

    The value of having certified proffessionals or professionals seeking / working toward certification is simple. The group will be working towards initiatives, that are to looked at from the outsider views and then is responsible for improving it as an insider… The entire difference is in the portfolio…
    Regarding data to prove, I would like to see if anyone here has some data that proves that a BB or GB saved x $k and it would not have been possible if the CARROT of Certification wasn’t there.
    Mahi
     

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    #83639

    Ibrahim Saras
    Participant

     Hi guys,
    After reading the original question and responses, I started thinking of how our company does it and if it really affects the Six Sigma benefits. We, as black belts, get certified after completing seven(7) DMAIC projects and our company is doing OK with Six Sigma but not great. Having non-certified black belts might have had something to do with not achieving great results!

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    #83640

    Terry
    Member

    I am a certified GB and know one thing for sure.
    A six sigma certified person tends to look for valid solutions to a problem in comparison to a person with little or no exposure to 6 sigma.
    Also essentially the top 20% of your population ends up getting looked at for a BB role. This helps since these guys are your cream and are more productive anyway

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    #83644

    Newlin
    Member

    I agree with the carrot before the horse.
    I was trained a year ago and still am not certified. I just recently was given full-time black belt status to pursue this.
    I have a question: I have read that a project should save around 100-250 thousand. None of my projects do that, and I fell that some may not be very good projects. Moral definately is an issue with the longevity outlook of the Black Belt Program.
    We are also starting Demand Flow Technology. Does anyone have experience with that and it seems the two are competing in some areas.

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    #83648

    Steve G
    Member

    To me, the central benefit of certification is that it focusses BBs and leadership on the the right thing – delivery of projects and the associated benefits ($$) whilst building depth of technical knowledge (culture). 
    I have seen plenty of people who not delivered in BB roles (fewer these days, thankfully) and as a former BB I am glad that I can differentiate myself from them and as an employer I am glad that I have a clear way of sorting applicants. 
    Certification criteria are not standard across businesses but what they should all do is to focus activity on the right things, e.g. completing projects (sigma and/or $$ benefit), coaching GBs, building technical knowledge and demonstrating this thru an exam, training GBs.  Process mapping, VOC collection, facilitation and all those other activites that build the business’s six sigma infrastructure are important but don’t, in my view, differentiate anyone enough to deserve certification. 
    There are BBs who have delivered through Six Sigma and BBs who have just had a strange job title.  Certification is a differentiator both internally and externally. 

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    #84952

    H bomb
    Participant

    Seriously people.  Back to the question.  You certify based on results not morale…wishes….or hope.   Determine what the certification criteria is and certify once achieved.  Especially in a shaky environment…management has to see/feel the results/benefit of Six Sigma.  You don’t achieve that by giving morale based certifications.

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    #85247

    Newlin
    Member

    I agree.  The certification is based on certain requirements. However, when a company self-certifies, the criteria and training may not be adequate outside the company.  I feel, talking to other black belts at other companies, that the training I’ve received is inadequate and makes me wonder if I’m learning it properly and doing it right. I’ve read many books on the subject and worry.  My goal for the year is of two different criteria…$ dollar savings and # of projects. I’ve achieved the $, but not the # of projects.

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    #86133

    thandi
    Participant

    The difference between DFT and MRP is simple!
    DFT – work flows
    MRP – IT DOESN’T
    Remember, WORKFLOW = CASHFLOW
    The evidence is in the balance sheet and P/L for all to see!

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    #125952

    pearl
    Participant

    Do you work in this field? are you certified in green/black belt? My husband is looking for work in quality, he has ISO and I think some other certifications but no green/black belt. He has six sigma knowledge – but no college degree or certification. should he get the certification? Do you think it will make him more marketable?

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    #125962

    Dog Sxxt
    Participant

    Dell computer does not certified their people involved in continuous improvement projects. Check the Dell stock price and earning over the years aganist other companies with formal black belt certification program shall give you the answer. May be Dell is a special case!
    I view certfication is only giving a slight advantage to those certified black belts for them to be more marketable than non-certified black belts. 

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    #126037

    BB
    Participant

    DELL computers certifies people at 3 levels: Yellow, Green & Black. They are planning to start another level (Brown) between Green & Black. The annual savings from projects in DELL amount to around $2.2Billion (hard, soft & avoidence).

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