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Looking for Tool to Determine Number of People Needed

Six Sigma – iSixSigma Forums General Forums Tools & Templates Looking for Tool to Determine Number of People Needed

This topic contains 8 replies, has 8 voices, and was last updated by  qualitymx 7 months, 2 weeks ago.

Viewing 9 posts - 1 through 9 (of 9 total)
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  • #237749

    G Robert Gettys
    Participant

    I’m looking for a tool or approach that works for others that takes into consideration a number of factors including time to complete individual tasks, complexity, and experience to help determine if our teams are right-sized or imbalanced. Any thoughts?

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    #237984

    Strayer
    Participant

    You might find some help at the Project Management Institute’s website. Microsoft Project and other good PM software might help, even if you are dealing with on-going teams rather than projects which begin and end. Bottom line is that there are complex estimating formulas which are still “guesstimates”. You don’t know what you don’t know so you have to make assumptions, and people are not equivalent.

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    #238007

    Eric Dickes
    Participant

    Discrete Event Modeling is a powerful tool to model the workflow and the optimal number of people to run it. It can handle variable distributions (like time to complete tasks) an have resource pools of different kinds of worker (skill level?). A really powerful insight it gives is the impact of delays caused by bottlenecks.
    We are currently using Extend software to model the workflow/patient throughput in a hospital setting. It is a fair amount of overhead to get it set up and running, but well worth it – if it is critical to make the right decisions regarding the workflow design/staffing.

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    #238008

    Bubb
    Participant

    If you’re thinking of the # of Production Operators and you have a recent [weekly] record of the overtime hours, add the OT hours (OTh) and divide by 36. This will get you close to # Operators needed to reduce overtime hours & operator-burnout. Note, I use 36 because 40 hours x 90% = 36, and most humans are about 90% efficient (in the long term) when working on production activities that require manual & hands-on actions. So when a person is present, they’ll be about 90% efficient, which is not same as utilization. And I round up for any fractional results.
    Example: If recent totaled OTh = 140 hours, divided by 36 = 3.89, rounded up = 4 operators needed.

    • This reply was modified 7 months, 2 weeks ago by  Bubb. Reason: format error
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    #238012

    qualitymx
    Participant

    Could someone explain the arguments to state that Crew to talk= process time/ takt time?
    To define quantity of people in a process?
    Is this assumption reliable?, does it have a math argument?
    What could be a real argument to consider it valid and reliable?
    Thanks

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    #238025

    Chris Seider
    Participant

    Look for waste ( http://leanmanufacturingtools.org/7-wastes/ ) and this will help you but don’t overanalyze too much–cut the waste and see what happens and see how the process improves.

    1
    #238026

    nvkrishna
    Participant

    This is a capacity determination problem. One could start with defining capacity as a function of experience and complexity, and then compare existing team capacity with the required capacity. However, this may be a non trivial exercise for software development, for example, where the standard deviation itself is very large. The capacity approach would be useful in a situation involving repetitive tasks and standard processes.

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    #238029

    Liam
    Participant

    Hi, just to 2nd Eric’s comment on Discrete Event Modeling / Process Simulation being very useful for this. Drop me an email and I would be happy to show you some examples using SIMUL8.

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    #238032

    qualitymx
    Participant

    Thanks Chris

    But I want to understand this in order to convince my boss, since is not clear for me, difficult will be to convince him.

    I wonder how dividing process time / takt time the result is quantity of people.
    Where is the basis to think like this?
    Where is the reasoning of this?

    Thanks

    in my poor thinking, time/ parts per time, results are parts, not quantity of people.

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