iSixSigma

Top 10 Candidate Qualities

Six Sigma – iSixSigma Forums Old Forums General Top 10 Candidate Qualities

Viewing 54 posts - 1 through 54 (of 54 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #30752

    CCoffee
    Participant

    What are the Top 10 qualities a Black Belt should possess?
     
    I am looking at this from the role of the champion who needs to select a Black Belt (either internal but more likely external) for a flagship process improvement project.  
     

    0
    #80639

    THG Krishnan
    Member

    Some of the important Qualities of a BB are:
    1. Engineering/Statistical graduate.
    2. Initiative and positive personality
    3. Ability to get along with people.
    4. Knowledge of the product/process
    5. ability to communicate & train people.
    6. ability to work in teams and be a prt of the team
    7. hard working and good problem solving skills.
     
    Hope I think this gives you some help.
     
    Thanks,
    Krishnan

    0
    #80640

    Arunachalam Anand
    Participant

    1. Should have good exposure to statistical tools and its applicability
    2. Should have sound business knowledge
    3. Should be a team player
    4. High level of analytical skills
    5. Good project management skills
    6. Smart worker and pleasing personality
    7. Good influencing skills
    8. Should understand the practalities of business
    9. Good presentation skills
    10. Self motivated

    0
    #80641

    Jimmy Sterner
    Participant

    Expert to find / see opportunities.
    Analytical expert.
    A lot of knowledge in Coaching.
    A wide competence in all area´s in the company (manufactoring, financial etc.
    Well structured.
    Well trained in 6S methodology.
    Positive.
    Team Player
    Should be able to talk a understandable language.
    Should have a lot of Drive to make changes.
     

    0
    #80642

    Harjot
    Participant

    Well, my list is different from the others. Maybe it gives you a different perspective … am a near-certified Black Belt in a large organization and this works for us. This is in decreasing order of priority.
    1. People skills (essential and necessary since the job is in a matrix org; folks with low understanding of people skills/handling typically struggle even if they are gifted statisticians)
    2. Adaptability … ability to change to the environment while holding on to the core values, and driving the wedge to change
    3. Communication … ability to simplify things without seeming condescending or chauvinistic …
    4. Clarity of thought process … respond to challenges positively while realizing that banging one’s head against the wall is futile. So many Black Belts get trapped in the paradigm that we can fix everything … fixing anything has a time/cost/resource/political constraint, that many organizations have in scarcity all the time …
    5. Ability to lead and build robust teams … people who can trust the Black Belt and really contribute to the project(s)
    6. Cheerleader … when things don’t work, a great Black Belt would persist while keeping the team morale high
    7. Networking … ability to show the senior people how big THIS project really is … this is probably as important as anything else on the list!
    8. Hunger in the belly … passionate people balanced with some detachment … this is difficult balance, but a 6/10 on this might be acceptable …
    9. Some knowledge of Six Sigma
    10. Some stats
    You might make a great Black Belt without points 9 & 10 since one learns on the job and people with qualities 1-8 would not have any problems with Stats and Six Sigma … they are always the easy part for everyone I know, including myself who isn’t the smartest of the lot anyways …
    Hope this helps!
    Harjot
    [email protected]
     

    0
    #80643

    Sesh
    Member

    Would restrict myself to the Top 3 main qualities that a Black belt should have
    1)Analytical approach for problem solving , preferable to have basic statistics knowledge
    2)Effective communicator and team player
    3)Leadership and Training skills.
    Thanks
    Sesh
     
     
     

    0
    #80649

    Mel Brown
    Participant

    I think a Black Belt should be able to do the following:
     
    Help the people on the project to have fun and enjoy what will surely be learned and gained by being a part of the six sigma experiance.
     
     
    Mel

    0
    #80655

    Harjot
    Participant

    Mel:
    Thanks, I think that helping the people on the project to have fun and enjoy the learning experience is the most important of it all … yours covers my list comprehensively!
    Regards,
    Harjot

    0
    #80659

    JLH
    Participant

    We have been very successful in using a 2 part evaluation that looks at technical skills and leadership.  For the leadership evaluation, we use a Gallup interview.  After 2 years, there is good correlation between our high performers and certain talents identified with Gallup.  I would suggest that you contact Gallup about using this very effective tool.  (Technical skill assessment simply shows if additional training is needed.)

    0
    #80667

    TG
    Member

    this is probably the most complete and accurate list ive seen – as a 6s leader in a large matrix organization with 10 bb’s reporting to me, these are absolutley the qualities you need…

    0
    #80669

    James M. Hollingsworth, MHA
    Participant

    Whoa!  Please keep in mind that statistical expertise is not limited to the engineering field.  Healthcare and transportation executives rely heavily on the use of statistics to make informed decisions.
    The BB selection process should avoid stereotyping.  The goal should be to hire the person best suited to communicate with people from all backgrounds while possessing a mastery of statistical and analytical techniques.

    0
    #80671

    Harjot
    Participant

    Hey tg! If that was for me … thank you …
    Harjot

    0
    #80672

    TG
    Member

    it was Harjot – i realized after i sent it that i didnt make it clear…im actually interviewing 6 candidates now for 2 positions so your thoughts are very timely..

    0
    #80674

    Bill Bozarth
    Participant

    All of the posts have excellent answers, however what I did not see is “Demonstrated performance as a Change Manager (Green Belt). Perfoming well as a Black Belt requires the knowledge and skills, which can best be obtained through actual experience.

    0
    #80675

    Thiede
    Participant

    Hi there
    Thanks for the list Harjot.  I am currently going for my green belt certification and plan on going for my black belt after that.  This list gives me a great understanding of what qualities are needed to be a successful black belt.  Any other pieces of wisdom are certainly appreciated.  You can email me at [email protected].  Thanks!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    0
    #80677

    Adam
    Participant

    All of the replies have been good.. My list would include (some overlap):
    1. Technical competence…knows the statistics behind the methodology
    2. Understands the linkage between project selection and the results the business wants from the initiative
    3. Can TEACH (not just present) Six Sigma.  Understands that for Six Sigma to be as successful as possible, different levels of the organization will have to LEARN it.
    4. Is a change agent….can help facilitate change management techniques.
    5. Is enthusiastic and passionate about Six Sigma
    6. Executive presentation skills
    7. Mastery Level of statistical software and Microsoft Office (or equivalent) suite of software
    8. Is process oriented
    9. Can motivate others 
    10. Questions the status quo
     

    0
    #80680

    Harjot
    Participant

    Thanks tg, appreciate that … I am in India and the GE business that I work for has at least 150 Black Belts. With so many peers, there’s a clear demarcation between successful Black Belts and the not-so-successful ones … those were some observations along with personal experience … have a great day,
    Harjot

    0
    #80725

    dan tegel
    Participant

    I have managed and initiated several six sigma efforts for Fortune 500 and midsize companies. Key ingredients to success are:
    1) Strong change management orientation. Knows how to get executives and mid-management support. Knows how to get organization wide buy-in using communications, training, consensus building meetings. Should have implemented six sigma or other process initiatives at all levels of the company.
    2) Strategic perspective. How to align six sigma with strategic objectives of the company, so that six sigma is making the company stronger competitively and financially. Many efforts are not focused on strategic issues, but reactive problems. Thus the effort doesn’t sustain itself.
    3) Political savy. Similar to #1, but requires 1-on-1 networking and consensus building.
    4) Ability to get results, quickly to demonstrate early success. Too many six sigma efforts drowned the business and waste time by overanalyzing (collecting way too much data for what is required). Most projects can be analyzed and solutions designed within 1-2 weeks. Anything more is overkill, and loses peoples energy, which you need for implementation.
    5) The best six sigma leaders I’ve seen have a passion for quality, customer service, and business improvement. They are typically frustrated by the status quo and keep pushing to change things.
    6) You need someone who has been through it. It gives credibility to the effort.
    7) Knows a six sigma or process improvement methodology; and has used it, and taught others. I don’t think all the statistical process control stuff and design of experiments is as important as others. Unless you are in a high volume production or process business, then running manufacturing experiments is more important.  In most companies, there are some many processes that are suboptimized, it would be better to get as many big gains, as quickly as possible.
    8) Significant change, out of the box thinker. Most processes can be improved by 50+%, if that is the objective of the project. Go for someone who goes after big change. A risk taker. The gains are there to be had.
    9) Balanced personality. If the person is a true change agent, which is what you need, you need someone with composure. Changing the organization and how business gets done, will upset and anger many. The person must be good a weathering all the snipers. I hope you are ready to support him or her, because others will attempt to undermine anything new. This is guaranteed.
    10) Ability to build trust.  If the person is a straightshooter, and follows through on what he or she says, others may not always like it, but they will come to trust the person. You need trust for others to follow.
    Good luck. If you want any clarification or suggestions, I would be happy to share experiences in getting started, or how to select the best candidates.
    Dan Tegel, Ph.D.
    760-944-1610
    Great question by the way.

    0
    #80744

    Chandra Mohapatra
    Participant

    The Blackbelt should be good at:
    1. Understanding the process
    2. Customer Handling (Both Internal and External)
    3. Communication
    4. Time Management
    5. Relationship management
    6. Networking
    7. Statistics
    8. Adaptability for change
    9. Extramiler
    10. Creativity

    0
    #80746

    CCoffee
    Participant

    Could you contact me directly about the Gallup Leadership Interview?
    [email protected]

    0
    #80748

    CCoffee
    Participant

    Extramiler?

    0
    #80753

    Scott Hermanson
    Member

    In my opinion, a Black Belt must possess the following qualities.  Although not confined to 10 (and in no specific order), these 10 qualities are an essential part of what makes up a successful project.
    1. Mastery of Six Sigma practices- (i.e.-Black Belt certification)
    2. Diverse work experience background-  This will enable the BB to see all sides of a project.  Example- Focusing on one discipline (i.e.- Statistics) will only allow that BB to use the tools, and may hinder the potential of the project.
    3. Focus on quality and not quantity-  The BB must understand that quality is not gained through the repetition of many projects, but more importantly through the repetition of many good projects.
    4. Selfishness- At the end of the day, a BB is the mentor, the leader, and the energizer of projects.  He or she must always look out for the needs and goals of all team members.
    5. Customer advocate- The customer (internal or external) is always the final judge of product or service quality.  Understanding those needs is the key to process improvement.
    6. Cost conscious- A BB must always be congnizant to the fact that being successful in business means being competitive.  You cannot be competitive without meeting customer needs at the lowest possible cost.
    7. Open to new ideas- There is not room for close-mindedness in Six Sigma.  Thinking outside the box is essential in order to make quality breakthroughs.
    8. Passion- Pure and simple, if you do not like what you do, you will not excel.
    9. Commitment- This ensures that the project will be pushed from start to finish, and at the highest levels.
    10. Fun- Have fun!  By doing so, you encourage others to do the same.

    0
    #80754

    Mike Carnell
    Participant

    CCoffee,
    I think you have recieved a lot of good input. This topic of a statistical background or an engineering background or any other formal degree as a prerequisite is absolutely unfounded. Formal training or a degree does not guarantee any form of success. The stats are for the most part handled by the software. Having someone who can actually implement a change is the key. If you have the greatest solution in the world and the most rigorous and perfect analysis and nobody will implement it you are just another piece of COPQ.
    When you throw the degree into the mix you just created a two class society. Your biggest  problem will be you just created a we /they situation with the very people you need to implement your change.
    I had a person in Wave one at Allied with no degree and didn’t even know how to turn on the laptop day one. He was consistently one of the top dollar producers after he graduated. It was his rapport with the people he worked with that made the difference. Rapport is not a function of formal training – it is the communication skills, people skills, leadership, etc. 
    There are many more cases just like this. Why would you run this risk for a characteristic that doesn’t correlate unless of course the objective is to not have to work very hard in class or site support. If that is your CTQ then the degree requirement might work out for you.
    Good luck.

    0
    #80755

    Mike Carnell
    Participant

    Scott,
    That is a decent list. Number 10 is important – but doesn’t get  much press.
    Thanks.

    0
    #80835

    CCoffee
    Participant

    I would like to thank everyone who answered this post. I have looked over the list and summized that the following highlights important attributes of a SS Candidate:
    Change Leader – Politically Savvy / Good influencing skills
    Positive, Passionate, Results Orientated
    Knows the Methodology & Some Basic Stats
    Team Builder
    Analytical and Organized
    Problem solver, Innovative, Creative, Uses Initiative
    Good presentation skills
    Business Knowledge
    Technically Savvy
    If anyone has any information on the Gallup Leadership Interview that “JLH” mentioned I would love to get some more details.
    [email protected]

    0
    #80841

    Thom Williams
    Member

    Great discussion.  Based on the participants, I grouped responses (hopefully my subjectivity does not offend) and established a ranking criteria based upon the number of appearances within the responses.
     
    There were 9 folks that took a stab at listing their top 10 qualities.  A few chimed in with enthusiasm for certain qualities, which I included.                         

    Quality

    Number times listed

    Rank

    Passion, initiative, cheerleader, positive, drive, self-motivated

    8

    1

    Communication and presentation skills

    7

    3

    People skills, relationship management, balanced personality, team player

    7

    3

    Commitment, get fast results, focus, project management, push project

    6

    4

    Statistics

    5

    6

    Motivate, lead, build trust, influence

    5

    6

    Knows Six Sigma methodology, been through it

    4

    10

    Networking

    4

    10

    Change management and adaptability

    4

    10

    Problem solving and analytical skills

    4

    10

    Diverse background, business knowledge

    3

    14

    Process and product understanding

    3

    14

    Strategic perspective, link project selection with business objectives

    3

    14

    Teach, Coach

    3

    14

    Customer advocate

    2

    18

    Open to new ideas, creativity, out of box thinker

    2

    18

    Time management, well structured

    2

    18

    Haves fun

    2

    18

    Quality focus

    1

    25

    Selflessness

    1

    25

    Cost conscious

    1

    25

    Risk taker

    1

    25

    Statistical and Microsoft software

    1

    25

    Questions status quo

    1

    25

    Engineering or Statistics Graduate

    1

    25
     

    0
    #80850

    Cannizzo
    Participant

    Thom,
    Thanks! for putting together this table. I was thinking of doing the same thing just yesterday to help me decipher what everyone thought were the best ideas. You’re terrific!
    –Carol

    0
    #80943

    boettler
    Member

    I’ve watched this discussion with interest. I’m a headhunter that specializes in Six Sigma positions. It’s wonderful to be able to get different perspectives on what’s important in a Black Belt’s qualities. Exept for 1 response, I didn’t see anybody else mention “Degree” in their lists.
    Do you think that a good Black Belt can work in any industry? If that person does not have a technical degree (i.e. Mech. Eng., Ind. Eng., etc.) can they adapt to manufacturing processes easily?
    Rob
     

    0
    #80944

    Arthur
    Participant

    For what ever its worth.  I have found that the purpose of obtaining a technical degree was to acquire specific skill sets in a specific industry.  This prepared me for the proper terminology, machine, equipment etc, as well as people skills that I would be surrounding myself in.   Should someone be hired if thy attained black belt status eventhough they have no degree? 
    If I was looing for someone to institute CPI (Continuous Process Improvement) across my plant and their black belt experiences included practical experience with VOC, On-time Deliver, competitive costing, standardized work, standard work-in-process, takt-time,  Leveled production, Pull system, continuous flow, Heijunka, 5S, Kaizen, Visual Control, Kanban, Poke-Yoke, TPM, TQC, etc,etc,etc, I would feel comfortable that this person could very quickly learn a particular manufacturing process in a relatively short time.   If I wanted a process expert without strong CPI skills set, I would have to know that this person could be brought up to speed in a short time. (more difficult to do).
     
      

    0
    #80948

    boettler
    Member

    Arthur,
    Thanks for response. Interesting perspective, but I think you’ve hit it right on the head—–it depends on the role that this person will play in the overall scheme.
    Rob

    0
    #80999

    T N Goh
    Member

    No doubt about it – other things being equal, an IE degree will give anybody a headstart in becoming a BB. 
    Of course, the various qualities that others have stated previously are needed too.  

    0
    #81023

    Marc Richarsdon
    Participant

    Thom,
    Thanks so much for the summary. Nothing like using using the tools to better understand and improve the process, in this case, the six sigma process itself. This is an example of why this website, and this forum in particular is so valuable. I only know of one other forum that has this much traffic and its focus is on ISO 9000.
    Marc Richardson
    Sr. Q.A. Eng.

    0
    #81029

    Savage
    Participant

    This is a very interesting conversation/debate.  My experience over the 15 years has indicated that you have two choices:
    1. “Buy” the skill set outside, or
    2. Develop it internally
    If you have time, option #2 is better for “human” side of the effort.  I would recommend (as a leader/coach) you are responsible for assembling the right team that has the right skill set.  A black belt is the poster child for “the jack of all trades”.  A statistician will fail during the implemenation.  A craftsman (without thorough training) will fail during the problem analysis.  You need both.  Bachelor’s degree or passionate employee?  A smart coach doesn’t put all of his eggs in one basket.  Think back to the best college sports team you know that performs year after year – what prereq’s do they have to be on the team?
     

    0
    #81038

    billybob
    Participant

    Hello folks,
    Here’s my thoughts of the 10 most important qualities of a Black Belt.  My ideas are based upon my personal; working of my BB.
    1. Always tell the plant manager you support the GBs with the time they need even when you don’t.
    2. Play golf with the plant Manager. Or if he ever stops short on a shop tour, you’d become engaged to him.
    3. Never really seem to have a BB project going on your own.
    4. Your certification project never sustained itself.
    5. You are often overheard over cubical walls or on phone conversations bad mouthing Green Belts for being the same type of  poor project managers as you are.
    6. You know all the tools….so go use them.
    7. You haven’t a clue as to what good project selection is for the GBs.
    8. You know well what an 8 to 5 shift means.
    9. You never been wrong, no matter how long it takes for you to be right.
    10. You’ll read this list and say, “I’m glad I’m a better BB than that!”
    Anyone for roasted possum on Thanksgiving?
    Later,
    Billybob
    Billybob
     
     
     

    0
    #81045

    FrustratedBB
    Participant

    Thanks, but no thanks, Billybob. I’ll pass on the roasted possum, I don’t need any more frustrations than I already own.
    But Agree with at least 5 of your thoughts, good job boy !!!
    Have a nice Thanksgiving,
    FrustratedBB

    0
    #81063

    Marc Richardson
    Participant

    Matt,
    Your post has brought a level of clarity to this debate. Perhaps I am stating the obvious but I would merely observe that this is the reason you put together a team. A good team is always more than the sum of its constituents. There is the aspect of bringing together the folks with the necessary technical skills: the process operator and the process engineer, the maintenance people and statistician, the dreamer and the doer.
    Another aspect is including someone on the team with a deep knowledge of the process being investigated and someone who is relatively unfamiliar with it. The benefits of the former person are obvious but they can also be limited by being to close to the problem and having difficulty seeing the whole picture. Sometimes they just can’t see past their assumptions. The benefit of the latter person is that they may bring a fresh perspective. They often have no preconceived notions of how the process is supposed to work. They can generalize solutions to other problems they have encountered and see the application to the situation at hand.
    A good leader brings together all these disparate elements, helps them set a few ground rules then gets out of the way and let the synergy of the team take over.
     
    Just my thoughts,
    Marc Richardson
    Sr. Q.A. Eng,

    0
    #81070

    Adam L Bowden
    Participant

    Hi Billy Bob
    Glad to see your tuned into reality – that is the alternative reality.
    Great list – I’m ging to share your humor with some of my BBs
    Best regards,
    Adam

    0
    #81072

    DColvin
    Participant

    I would definitely agree with the fact that good communication, project managment and people skills are some of the most important.  Statistcal tools are generally easier to learn than managment or communication skills.  The majority of statistical tools can be implemented with the use of a reference book or the help of another BB or MBB.  Of course, analytical ability is important, however, if you don’t possess this ability whatsoever….you probably shouldn’t be in this field!

    0
    #81073

    billybob
    Participant

    Hello Folks….and in particular Adam,
    You know its funny because its the truth!  The only trouble I had with making my list of ten BB qualities was that I had to narrow it down from the 18 I had written. 
    Later,
    Billybob
     

    0
    #81078

    Heebeegeebee BB
    Participant

    I stick by the “Jedi Mind Trick”   indespensible tool.
    Heebee

    0
    #81082

    Terrell Simpson
    Member

    Hi all,
    I am a twice certified BB working with the Six Sgima methodology since 1995. Having implemented small and large scale projects over the years the approach that sticks with me in choosing candidates and/or teams is to conduct an assement of the barriers to transferring the knowledge necessary to successfully deploy a program or project at each level of interaction: a form of PFMEA in a sense. When this is viewed carefully against the goals, objectives, constraints, and environment within which the individual/team will be conducting tasks it helps to clarify the characteristics that are required. I view the selection process as Y = f(x): where Y is a clarification of the problem be answered, and the x’s are the barriers to success and the traits needed.
    My 2 cents,
    Terrell.

    0
    #83996

    Ex MBB
    Participant

    Wondering where ‘patience’ and ‘persistance’ would figure? Whether it is teaching a BB/GB course or mentoring projects or trying to ‘change manage’ supervisors dont all change agents need these 2?
    -exMBB

    0
    #115028

    BB without MBB
    Participant

    One year into Six Sigma deployment we lost our MBB support and were bought by another org.  The improvement process is going forward in the new org with enthusiasm, but currently without MBB leadership.  There are mixed feelings and conflicting advice on the necessity of such leadership.  With all your deployment experience what are your thoughts on this issue.  BB without MBB

    0
    #115041

    Bob J
    Participant

    BB without MBB,
    I guess it depends on the needs of your six sigma deployment in your company…
    The role of the MBB in my organization is that of a trainer and BB mentor…  This is important to us to ensure that we effectively manage the program as it fits our business needs….
    If you have access to resources (internal or external) that can effectively enable you to manage this aspect of your program, it should not matter if they are MBB or not…. 
    Hope this helps…
    Best Regards,
    Bob J

    0
    #115042

    RidgeRunner
    Member

    Hey Billy Bob!How about sharin’ the other 8 on your list? About now we need a little break in the action.RR

    0
    #116361

    JeffGSMC
    Participant

    I have not read any of the posts, and this is my first time logging on to this site.  I am preparing to retire from the United States Navy with 20 years successful active service.  I am looking forward to entering the job market in a Six Sigma arena.  The reason I am posting here is that I believe the civilian marketplace does not realize that the USN went through a “Quality Transformation” back in the early 90’s and that there were numerous individuals who were trained in Dr. Deming’s philosophies under the title of TQL, Total Quality Leadership.  I spent 3 years as a Quality Advisor and have instructed 1000+ sailors in the Quality thought process.  Additionally, I have over 400 hours of training, ranging from Team Skills and concepts to Systems Approach to Process Improvement to Implementation in an organization.  After rambling, my point is this:  Service personnel hold all of the attributes described in this forum.  Their work ethic is unmatched, the integrity is superb, and the mindset they are given in the military beats anything that any corporation can provide.  I just wanted to give my 2 cents worth when someone looks for a quality person who wants to work in the Six Sigma field.  They may not have the “bells and whistles” required by the hiring personnel, but sometimes “unknowable costs” can be “unknowable benefits”.  Thanks for the time.

    0
    #116363

    Dayton
    Member

    Jeff,
     
    You raised some good points, and it sounds like you might well have a future in Six Sigma.  Any highly quantitative and improvement based field needs experienced hard driving people of integrity and discipline.   I have many of the bells and whistles that you speak of but sorely lack discipline. Hopefully there’s room in this exciting and profitable field for all of us.   Best wishes in your pursuit of a post-service career and thanks for standing guard for 20 years.
     Vinny

    0
    #116370

    JeffGSMC
    Participant

    Vinnie,
    Thanks for the reply and the compliment.  I just want to make sure this great field doesn’t miss out on an untapped resource of knowledge / experience / discipline / mindset that could really make visions / philosophies like Six Sigma / TQM / Process Improvement go beyond wildest expectations.  I’m looking forward to becoming a part of this realm, and hopefully I can learn from some of the best and possibly throw in some of my 20 years military experience. 

    0
    #116375

    Darth
    Participant

    Jeff, congrats on your upcoming retirement.  But, I would be remiss in not challenging some of your statements.  I was one of those who was very active in providing consulting to the Navy back in the 80’s-90’s when they discovered Deming.  Navair was one of the leaders in that endeavor.  While we met some very caring and talented people, some of the inherent policies of the Navy along with the large civilian workforce and budgeting processes presented major barriers to successful implementation of what Deming was trying to do and what eventually morphed into TQM/TQL.  Interestingly enough we are back into the same sites with many of the same people still in charge again trying to implement Lean Six Sigma.  Same problems, same issues and I wonder if what you said was so true, why are we revisiting this again?  I also question whether the military mindset is the best one for dramatic, creative and challenging changes.  I have found much of the workforce to be content with the rules, regs and chain of command.  In any population there are outliers and possibly you are one of them.  If so, welcome to the civilian workwork and I hope you are successful in your endeavors.  Our consulting organization has hired a number of ex-military and they are doing well for us and the client.

    0
    #116376

    JeffGSMC
    Participant

    Darth,
    I’m going to agree to disagree with you on a couple of statements (isn’t that why we do these forums, to share ideas?).  “Inherent policies” is the major reason for TQM, TQL, ISO9000, and etc.  Doing things the same old way and fear of change is why so little progress has been made or had been made in the past.  Deming took a country who embraced change and look what happened.  Mindsets changed and companies blossomed.  I was a player in San Diego at a Maintenance activity and we were able to pick out the process the workers (internal customers) wanted as our beginning project.  It was something as simple as a new telephone book (yeah, you read correctly).  This was such a common project, yet it showed the employees that the philosophy could work, that management was listening to its customers, and dividends (albiet not monetary) paid off.  The problem with the Navy’s implementation was that they didn’t go black and red in regards to money; it just keeps coming.  No need to improve if there isn’t a limit of funds.  I think the military mindset is the best one to be brought into the civilian workforce; the drive, determination, and ability to say no to something that looks, smells, and tastes bad is what has made the military have the ability to right itself when things are wrong, and throw a “reality check” into the mix when needed.  Disclaimer:  The Navy is the only job I’ve ever had, so I’m in for a brand new experience, but I think that will be my advantage vice my downfall.  One point that I agree with on completely: NAVAIR did wonders for showing the rest of the Navy that TQL could work. 

    0
    #116378

    Darth
    Participant

    Jeff, two policies in particular seem to be major barriers to long term successful change.  First, the short cycle rotation for the military leadership.  Unfortunately, the tendency is to come into a command and make changes, whether justified or not.  Remember Deming and his Constancy of Purpose?  A little tough when the new CO wants to change direction and priorities every few years.  The second is the budgeting process.  The money is first taken away by Congress and then we discuss where we can improve to make up the shortfall.  Usually the private sector first asks, where and how much.  The military says, “OK, we just took $150 million out of the budget, now figure it out.”  Puts a little pressure on the system which can lead to short term thinking.  I just found it fascinating coming back to a site after about 20 years and hearing the same sad stories and problems.

    0
    #116380

    JeffGSMC
    Participant

    Darth,
    You are absolutely right on both counts, but there was a thought process in regards to the CO changeover.  The idea was to move the XO up to the CO spot and continue that to keep that “constancy of purpose”.  That does not stop the problem of “hidden agendas” and “me” thinking.  That broadens into yet another topic of evaluations, which Deming detested anyway.  If the competition wasn’t there, that constancy of purpose would be able to thrive.  As far as the budgeting goes, each command could save hundreds of thousands of dollars, but why, when you know that someone else would do something with it, most likely on something not needed.  The worst part of this whole mentality is this:  the Japanese had morals and virtue; the company succeeded, the individual succeeded, therefore the culture succeeded.  In the US, there is so much corruption, “me” mentality, and greed, process improvement, TQM, TQL, ISO 9000, and whatever other name you want to apply to it will always take a back seat when a CEO or a Financial officer can make an extra buck.  I’m not being negative, just realistic.  I hope I can make a difference in the community; that’s all.

    0
    #116382

    Darth
    Participant

    You have permission to come aboard…good luck.

    0
    #116391

    jimbo
    Participant

    JeffGSMC,
    As a former brother-in-arms (USAF — sorry I’m not a squid) currently in this career field, I would like an offline discussion with you.  E-mail me at [email protected].
    Jimbo

    0
Viewing 54 posts - 1 through 54 (of 54 total)

The forum ‘General’ is closed to new topics and replies.