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Twenty Five Years of Six Sigma

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  • #54009

    Praveen Gupta
    Participant

    Six Sigma was launched officially on January 1, 1987 at Motorola. It was launched as an internal methodology to improve quality. Six Sigma did wonders at Motorola during 1987 – 1992. Motorola doubled the sales with same number of people and multiplied the income. It also launched iconic products that launched the Cell phone industry. How do people think of Six Sigma twenty five years later.

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    #192800

    Gary Cone
    Participant

    @PraveenGupta Thought 1 -Too bad Motorola’s Six Sigma did not survive poor leadership.

    Thought 2 – Six Sigma did not give the wonders in isolation – Cycle Time Reduction (Lean), Participative Management (respect for people), Aligned reward systems, and an environment where innovation flourished played at least equal roles to 6S. Why don’t you tell people about all of the initiatives on the card that was given to every Motorola employee?

    Thought 3 – Six Sigma is just a buzz word (phrase) that has legs because of all of the really hard working creative people that have embraced a method that has it’s roots in the 1960’s and Deming and Juran.

    Thought 4 – the thought process worked well 50 years ago and will work well 50 years from now. The need for the thought process will also exist 50 years from now.

    Thought 5 – the practice of Six Sigma is equally filled with really bright intelligent hard working people and people who think they have found a free ride – just like every other human endeavor. The hard working folks give 6S legs, the free riders give 6S a bad rap.

    Praveen, are you still conjuring sigma levels?

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    #192803

    gomezadams
    Member

    Gary,
    I agree wholeheartedly.
    Thought 6-The process works as long as support exists. This support is at the whim of the economic times and the wimps we have running our companies.

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    #192807

    MBBinWI
    Participant

    @PraveenGupta – “teach” innovation? – now you’ve stepped in it.

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    #192808

    Gary Cone
    Participant

    Thank you Praveen,

    I am also glad you are doing well. I will look at your current work. Thanks for sharing.

    Here are links to my current work –

    https://www.isixsigma.com/new-to-six-sigma/deployment/deployment-planning-video/

    http://www.gpsqtc.com/

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    #192809

    MBBinWI
    Participant

    Gosh, @mikecarnell – 25 years, I was just a kid. Tell us “youngin’s” what it was like in them “olden times!” I hear there wasn’t even color on them TV’s, let alone HD quality, and radio was only AM!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    Didja hafta shoot ‘yer own buffalo for meat?

    Makin’ you feel OLD, yet?

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    #192810

    MBBinWI
    Participant

    @PraveenGupta – While Moto gets credit for the MAIC process methodology, it really goes back thousands of years and can more appropriately be attributed to the process of brewing BEER!
    Yes, even before Minitab, monks were experimenting with various yeasts, ingredients, fermentation, and brewing methods. They measured, analyzed their measurements, noted incremental improvements, and after implementing their changes, established controls to ensure consistency of output. It was slow, and laborious, but effective, nonetheless.

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    #192812

    Darth
    Participant

    Watch it young whippersnapper. Although I wasn’t involved in the original work done by Gary and Mike I am quite a bit older than they are. Oh wait, what were we talking about????? Darn forgot again….now where did I put my car keys?

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    #192813

    Trish G
    Participant

    Civilization was built on the brewing of beer

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    #192814

    MBBinWI
    Participant

    @Trish – which might also account for the many “collapses” of civilization?

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    #192815

    Trish
    Guest

    Naaaaah….egos topple civilizations, in the words of Ben Franklin, “Beer is proof that god loves us and wants us to be happy”

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    #192816

    Gary Cone
    Participant

    Sorry Trish, but –

    “Beer-themed web sites, brewing organizations and even “beer writers” are fond of quoting Franklin and his supposed love of beer Β— “Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy.” But after recently hearing a lecture by Chicago-based brewing historian, Bob Skilnik, that convincingly asserts that Franklin was writing about rain, its nourishment of grapes, and ultimately, its conversion into wine, Stevens decided to do his part in correcting this historical inaccuracy.”

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    #192817

    Stevo
    Member

    Damn Gary, you’re killing my buzz. Anyone willing to transition from SS to beer is ok with me. Speaking of beer, next time you are in Chicago, I own you one.

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    #192818

    MBBinWI
    Participant

    @stevo – least he’s not talking about that damn stuff made from stems and leaves.

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    #192819

    Trish
    Guest

    Gary, you are a wealth of knowledge on many subjects…
    Fine…then I’ll say it…”beer is proof that god loves us and wants us to be happy” from now on it can be attributed to me….

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    #192820

    Mike Carnell
    Participant

    @Trish Actually that quote is from Benjamin Franklin.

    @MBBinWi Do you remember the big (we thought it was little) Compaq computer with the orange screen? Well when we started this, it was before that. Back when you had to Key punch cards at ASU to run analysis on SAS or SPSS. I actually still have my original control charts (done by hand – yes people it is possible) and I kept them in a book called “Mike’s Control Charts Sacred Sh*t”. We worked with Mario Perez Wilson making bomb fuses (for the government) and Mario kept all out data on a computer that ran Lotus 123. Almost blew the factory up (with Mario and Adi Bhote) running a DOE and cooking a bunch of flux to raise the specific gravity. No vent hood. Alittle touch and go for a while. Lots of good memories. To quote Val Kilmer as Doc Holiday “I am in my prime.”

    @PraveenGupta Gary was way to kind. Not real sure what you were trying to accomplish with your post other than find a way to plug your “teaching innovation.” I am on the record for what I think about that piece of work. I guess the idea of selling a non statistical approach to Six Sigma is in the past so now you are into innovation. When I look at the string of books you have published you don’t really seem to care much about what horse you ride.

    Just my opinion

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    #192821

    Mike Carnell
    Participant

    @GaryACone Don’t you find it amazing that all these guys that want to claim they did this and they did that “back in the day” conveniently forget that PMP (Participative Management Program) had been around for years. Gary Flack was teaching cycle time reduction. Supply Chain Management and all the other things that were going on that were taught in MMI over two weeks but the only thing they can seem to get out of their mouth is Six Sigma.

    Damn I am starting to sound as jaded as Whitney and his pink X’s.

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    #192831

    MBBinWI
    Participant

    @Darth – um, that would be keys for the TIE Fighter, or maybe Death Star (although you keep getting those blown up).

    @Mike-Carnell – Hmmmm, let’s see, if we’re playing “remember when”, then I still have my mahogany slip-stick. The TI-35 took a perfect parabolic arc ending in a sudden stop in the driveway after the final exam. And I still have my Minitab manual from school (circa 1981 – it’s probably older than Jenn!) showing how to do some of the most basic stats using punch cards. I remember a fellow classmate taking his semester project to the lab and tripping on the stairs, dumping his stack of cards and a bunch of us helping him sort them (seems funny now, but the cards were numbered with a printed number and had to be physically collated). I didn’t have one of those “portable” Compaq’s, but a fellow army buddy did. Ran the OS on one disk, and had to put another one in to hold the data (man, can you imagine an entire OS on one 5 1/4″ floppy? My first desktop had a Full Height HD with a whopping 10Mb and I never filled it up.).

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    #192832

    Thomas Whitney
    Member

    @Mike-Carnell I didn’t keep my control charts I did by hand, but I also remember being able to look at a list of numbers and tell you the average and standard deviation cause I hand calculated these values so often. I bought a little machine that I could type in the numbers and it printed out control charts about 3 inches wide like a ticker tape machine. Man what a productivity saver.

    @MBBinWI I was the first person to get that first Compaq “luggable” and was ecstatic at all the memory it had! And it didn’t seem that heavy to carry around. I remember when you had to write the command code for Minitab.

    And I have a green, red and pink shirt I wear when I do projects now. I can feel which color of X I am going to find.

    However, regardless of from whence six sigma originated (though I suspect it did have something to do with beer) there is no question in my mind that I wrote and have the original and best Six Sigma Training Material……Gary KNOWS this to be true

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    #192835

    Gary Cone
    Participant

    Hey Tom, if you want me to agree with that I need to know how much money it’s worth to you. I have a couple of arrogant Dr.’s offering a lot.

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    #192843

    Mike Carnell
    Participant

    @PraveenGupta I am always going to have difficulty with someone who does SS stat free. That would be a pure oximoron.

    The thing that did not “wake me up” but I found irritating and condescending was your remark to Gary that he was “still hanging around.” He has been and continues to be a practitioner on virtually a daily basis. Actually most everyone on this thread is a practitioner on a daily basis. Nobody is hanging around. This is what we do and we do it because we are passionate about it.

    Gary, Tom and I were all at Motorola in the beginning. Gary and I were on Allied and GE. We have most of the benchmark deployments covered. Pretty much nonstop deployments since Allied started in 1995. I am not sure I remember what deployments you were on. Maybe you can help me remember which ones they were.

    Just my opinion.

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    #192844

    Mike Carnell
    Participant

    @MBBinWI you need to remember the last liar always wins. I still have a Commodor 64 in my garage somewhere. I even have the batteries that were all shrink wrapped together. After messing with that thing I didn’t want anything to do with computers for years

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    #192859

    Praveen
    Guest

    Mike, what you call an oxymoron, I call it innovation! When you can replace 3-days of statistics that people, including experts get confused about, there are always exceptions, with 30 minutes of rules without losing ability to solve problems, it is an innovation in Six Sigma that every non-statistical person learn instead of ignoring Six Sigma because of too much statistics.

    As to what I said to Gary in my message this is an open forum for adults. We do not need third party or person to monitor conversations, really! Gary and I are adults and mutually respectful for some banter.

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    #192860

    Praveen Gupta
    Participant

    Mike, Here is my first case study that was completed in 1987, and is available through ASQ. – Respectfully… prvn

    Copyright: 1990, Marcel Dekker, Inc. and ASQC
    Author: Delott, Charles; Gupta, Praveen;
    Organization: Motorola, Inc.
    Subject: Design of experiments (DOE); Motorola Corporation; Printed circuit board (PCB);
    Six Sigma; Standard deviation; Variation;
    Series: Quality Engineering, Vol. 2, No. 3, JANUARY 1990, pp. 269-284

    Abstract: This report presents the results of a systematic study to reduce process variability. A series of experiments were conducted to identify the control variables which caused variation in the process and their new settings for improved results. The copperplating thickness affected the electrical performance of the circuit at high frequencies. The variation in the plating thickness was difficult to detect with simple control charts. Much engineering time was wasted in trying to determine what was wrong with the process and how to fix it. As a result of the process characterization, the authors were able to prove that process variability could be reduced by a factor of two. The potential benefits with reduced process variability included elimination of inspection, savings by reducing the thickness of silver coating on the ceramic substrates, and engineering time used on improving other processes rather than fighting plating problems continuously.

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    #192862

    Chris Seider
    Participant

    I’m glad the spice and fun of the discussion boards are back. Thanks to the isixsigma.com website.

    Does the website have a mascot? I suggest a Phoenix.

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    #192863

    Mike Carnell
    Participant

    @PraveenGupta Innovation? It didn’t seem to catch on. How did you get to 3 days of statistics? Which experts were confused? Those are glittering generalities and have zero substance.

    I appreciate the reference on the case study. That is A (singular) case study. The question was what deployments?

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    #192864

    Mike Carnell
    Participant

    @PraveenGupta You are correct. This is an open forum. I have not seen anything regarding age requirements just as there are no requirements around actual knowledge of Six Sigma, Lean, Lean Six Sigma, TOC or even innovation.

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    #192871

    MBBinWI
    Participant

    @cseider – I think a sado-masochist would be a better mascot.

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    #192873

    Straydog
    Guest

    Love the banter. Miss the substance. Let’s try to focus on the latter. FYI, I was with Allied, now Honeywell, 1977-2004 so I appreciate the dinosaur sightings. Bottom line, 6S works when used properly. Let’s talk about that.

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    #192874

    Praveen Gupta
    Participant

    Mike,

    I hope responding to your question is not considered self-promotion. There is a presentation about my history of Six Sigma at my LinkedIn profile with actual pieces of work. in 1985 I was working in Austin, TX while developing a 4 Sigma program in late 85 and early 1986. In Aug. 86 I moved to Schaumburg and started working with Bill Smith, the inventor of Six Sigma, in prototyping the methodology in Fixed Products Division. The projects were called Small Wins to Six Sigma. Overall, I was part of led three CEO Awards, including one for teaching Six Sigma at Motorola University, and a SABA presentation under the sponsorship of Bill Smith himself. All of this work was under the banner of Six Sigma, not its predecessors for 100s of years in the name of statistical tools. Then, I guided the first DFSS project, called High 5 project. I am not sure if there is a case study published before the one I posted above in a peer reviewed journal. If there is one, I would love to learn about it. I have even posted my performance reviews to demonstrate the originality of my comments if someone questions them. Knowing other people working in respective areas, I was the Group Leader of Process Engineering Group charted for leading Six Sigma deployment. Of course, Six Sigma was not a one-man initiative but I feel I played a significant role in rolling it out directly working with the inventor.

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    #192877

    Straydog
    Guest

    Praveen,

    I am very glad to learn that this question came from someone who was there at the beginning. Accordingly this thread should unwind into more serious discussion. My complaint with it as it’s often taught and practiced today is that it centers on dogmatic procedures, mandated tools, and the minutiae of statistics. We would do much better if the reason for doing it was kept foremost. Some companies claimed tremendous benefits that did not show up on their financial statements and the industry press asked, rightfully so, why not? Some companies that adopted it as a managment philosophy have relegated it to a back office, low profile function. The bottom line question is how do we convince the non-believers that this was not a passing management fad?

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    #192878

    Praveen Gupta
    Participant

    We identified four aspects of Six Sigma… intent, methodology, tools and measurements. People ignore the intent, get busy with the methodology and tools, and do not want to measure because of lack of results.The intent is achieving dramatic improvement quickly. If we keep this in mind methods and tools will help. The challenge is in the name of data driven methodology and statistical tools, Six Sigma become the end in itself instead of remaining a tool to improve. One should remember that most of the tools in the Six Sigma methodology are non-statistical, and my understanding that most of the Six Sigma projects are not about variability reduction they are about adjusting the mean. (We should do a survey at iSixSigma about this.) Variability reduction requires redesigning the process in most cases.

    Convincing non-believers about power of Six Sigma is done by producing success stories and keeping it simple. Six Sigma was designed to be a business process improvement methodology to become the best in everything we did using whatever tools we needed. Based on participants’ feedback we developed the simplified Stat Free Six Sigma approach. Most people do not like training in statistics as it is boring, puts them to sleep, and at the end of the day they do not get it. More over, as a society we are weak in Math which does not help with statistical tools. Using software alone does not help as statistics and softwares do not solve problems, people with statistical thinking solve problems. Teaching statistical thinking is more valuable and productive than a ton of statistics.

    I am sure some of my comments here will get some flack! But debate is healthy for learning.

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    #192879

    Mike Carnell
    Participant

    @PraveenGupta So you did Motorola over 20 years ago but a lot of people did. That’s it?

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    #192882

    Gary Cone
    Participant

    @Straydog @PraveenGupta

    Straydog, I agree with your criticism of what many do in the name of Six Sigma or even worse Lean Six Sigma. The same criticisms have to be leveled at Lean and TPM (the label given to Lean by many companies including Unilever and P&G).

    I can show changed culture and bottom line results at my customers – most recently tripled productivity over historical numbers, production capacity up by >20%, and 3% to the bottom line after much of the savings were channeled to increased marketing spend. This is a Fortune 50 company.

    I don’t know what Praveen can show with his non statistical approach, but I doubt it’s much.

    Praveen, we take exactly the opposite approach. We make sure change agents have the math skills, it is probably the reason we teach this approach to mainly Engineers and Financial types. Where the work force lacks skill, we incorporate into job training. Results are the best way to convince non-believers. The best endorsement we get (and we get get it all the time) is the people who tell us they like their job better now.

    I’d appreciate if you would explain how to teach statistical thinking without teaching statistics. It sounds like pure snake oil to me.

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    #192885

    Katie Barry
    Member

    @PraveenGupta – Please remember that you are free to have as much promotional content as you’d like in your User Profile.

    For all community members, here is a reminder of one of our etiquette points – Be considerate to others. It should go without saying that you should treat others as you would like to be treated. iSixSigma community moderators are authorized to edit or delete anything deemed rude, obnoxious or abusive but weΒ’re not here to moderate squabbling. If you have a differing viewpoint, either defend your position or ignore the others.

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    #192886

    Praveen Gupta
    Participant

    I love to learn more about new knowledge and experiences Six Sigma professionals have created or gained. It is easy to criticize anything than to create. Creating something… write or wrong… at least experimented… is better than just talking about nothing.

    I just came to check in how the Six Sigma community is doing after a long time! I will check back in again later.

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    #192888

    Praveen Gupta
    Participant

    To celebrate 25 years, I would like to share a presentation by Betty Smith, wife of Bill Smith, the inventor of Six Sigma.

    The Woman Behind Six Sigma… http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6ljSknR_6cg

    Enjoy!

    Praveen

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    #192891

    Gary Cone
    Participant

    @PraveenGupta

    Praveen, I am sorry you see my statement of facts as self promotional. They are not. Nor are they an attack. They are just a reflection of my experience.

    Non-statistical Six Sigma can’t be anything more than the seven basic tools and they needed to be augmented at Motorola and they need to be augmented today.Yes we can get some traction early in the transactional side without them, but augmentation is needed within six months if you really want to improve.

    Just a clarification of Bill’s role. He contributed the phrase Six Sigma, he articulated clearly that processes get worse after qualification (the 1.5 shift was his metaphor for this), and he was passionate about his work. He did not invent Six Sigma.

    As many of us on here can prove – Tom Whitney, Mike Carnell, John Lupienski, and our old friend Dr. Mikel Harry – all of the things called Six Sigma were already being done before Bill gave it a catchy title. I personally learned all the tools between 1972 and 1976 and really learned to use them as a strategy between 1980 and 1984. All of the people cited above plus Steve Zinkgraf were the ones who helped me learn. I never learned anything from Bill but had great debates with he and Pete Peterson in the mid 80’s. I don’t remember seeing you there however.

    I am fairly sure it is you who is self promoting by using the “we” word for things that happened at Motorola and trying to impress us with your son’s school in Andover and what you learned there. By the way I learned the same things from my parents as did most of us.

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    #192893

    Thomas Whitney
    Member

    @PraveenGupta @KatieBarry Katie, I appreciate your comments on etiquette. I like it when Gary or Mike or that Darth Vader guy on this site kicks my but with strong and slanderous words when I say something not to their liking. It is the only way they can get through to a strong willed person like me. I have a Masters Degree in Psychology and went to a school that taught all forms of counseling. I learned that if you are working with a New York client use Adler techniques (a get in your face technique) because that works best with them; If you are working with a mid-westerner use a Young technique (very nice and attentive) because that works best with them. However, no Psychologist is good at all techniques and should and do only use one. If censor is the game who do you censor, Adler or Young. If you talk about respect, then respect the psychologist technique to whom you dare to reveal your thoughts. Do not read our inputs if they offend you communication style.

    I work at the tactical level of LSS deployment for a reason. All this talk of high level methods and which school of process change is right, or who is the father of six sigma or no bores me.There is only one thing that matters. Is the tactical level six sigma change agent able to create change?

    An LSS change agent needs to keep a couple of principles in mind every second of their interface with anyone in a process. Your skill only allows you to work “on” a process not “in” a process. We are change agents and only change agents. But, the people in the process at the first interaction with you will assume you think you are an expert at working in the process. They think that you think that even though they live 25% to 50% of their life in that process, you think you know what they need to change to make it better. Our job is only to take what they know or believe is true, convert it to data and assess whether what they know is true or think is true is true. The assess part is the catch. Just taking data is statistics. Assessing data is definitely statistics.

    Examples are good. In my last assignment there was a problem with achieving the proper thickness of a cracker. Thickness is a very important parameter for the cracker. There was not one person in the entire bakery that did not absolutely state that wet dough weight was the primary factor in determining thickness. All efforts in the past and now were placed on dough weight variation with no success. I quietly in the background took data and did a regression on dough weight to thickness. The results showed there was no relationship! I assembled all the subject matter experts and operators in a room and showed the results. A riot erupted with most stating strongly that my data was obviously wrong. Then, a very quiet and unassuming R&D person raised his hand a stated, “It is the meal content of the cracker that effects the thickness the greatest. And depending on the flour used there is an interaction”. Making a long story short we used “statistics” to get the meal and flour ratios correct. Problem solved.

    I think I will get into this “Father of Six Sigma” stuff. What I just stated above about our role as change agents and how to do it, I learned form Bill Smith, Marty Rayl, Gary Cone and Mike Carnel. Marty and Rick were best friends and collaborated allot as to what six sigma should look like and Marty even bounced stuff off of people like Gary, Mike and even me. The work being done in the automotive sector was equivalent to an R&D effort for six sigma because the automotive sector was years ahead in implementing statistical control at the demand of our customers. We started this stuff in 1983. So the date of 1987 is wrong; Six sigma started in Motorola in 1983 in the automotive sector. It expanded company wide in 1987. Marty had Rick interview me for a position in the Com division after my “training period” was over. Rick was brutal but at the end of the interview complemented me in introducing some good new techniques in the change management process of six sigma. I think Rick interviewed a whole lot more people than just me. So who is the father of six sigma? I don’t think Rick would accept the title singularly.

    As a consultant in the field you are only as good as your customer says you are. At the tactical level of the Fortune 50 company Gary spoke of the operations VPs all tell me they have heard of me and want me to go work in their divisions. Not a boast a fact. Why? Because after my first engagement in the company the OVP was impressed. He had never had a BUM and a Plant manager tell him that he needed to meet this consultant who can turn any argument into numbers and then turn those numbers into improvement actions.

    Enough said…

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    #192894

    Mike Carnell
    Participant

    @twhitney Nicely written. I did figure you were going to come after me today though.

    So is Texas Andler or Young? To many guns to be very hard core Andler I think.

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    #192895

    Praveen Gupta
    Participant

    Here are iSixSigma articles about Bill Smith, the father of Six Sigma:

    https://www.isixsigma.com/press-releases/bill-smith-honored-first-inductee-six-sigma-hall-fame/

    https://www.isixsigma.com/new-to-six-sigma/history/remembering-bill-smith-father-six-sigma/

    At the least, Bill must be a genius for taking old statistical tools and bundling them into Six Sigma package, a best branded quality improvement methodology to date saving billions of dollars! We all are proudly showing his work in our credentials and making money off Six Sigma. We are here on this Forum because Bill invented Six Sigma.

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    #192897

    Thomas Whitney
    Member

    @Mike-Carnell Actually Texas is quit Jung in the counseling. The whole gun and laser thing is just a face persona thing. I’m really quite passive but not Young.

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    #192899

    Mike Carnell
    Participant

    @twhitney So is that Young or Jung for Texas? I didn’t realize you were into all this soft stuff.

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    #192900

    Thomas Whitney
    Member

    I left out John Lupienski and Steve Zinkraff above. To me John was the definitive master of process assessment and it was great learning from him. I hired Steve into Seguin because all I knew were the 7 basic tools and knew we needed allot more sophisticated tools for the problems we had. Steve was a Navy Reserves friend of mine who was also an applied statistician.
    He brought the discipline of MA-IC to the plant as an analysis methodology. We had brown bag lunches every Friday where he reviewed our projects. His MA-IC process became MAIC under Harry and then DMAIC at GE.

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    #192901

    Thomas Whitney
    Member

    It’s Jung, I spelled it wrong in the original. I know who would believe.

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    #192905

    Mike Carnell
    Participant

    @twhitney You know what is really fun to watch is John’s 14 1.5 hour VHS tapes that he did of himself teaching the course to prepare for the CQE. You need to watch one of those just before you watch Gary’s interview. If you do that Gary will get some king of iSS Oscar if we can ever get Fake Mike to start running his iSS Live Conferences again.

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    #192907

    Gary Cone
    Participant

    Praveen, did you actually listen to what those links you posted say?

    You said – “At the least, Bill must be a genius for taking old statistical tools and bundling them into Six Sigma package”

    This is false. I have the original flow charts showing linkage and strategy of using tools. The contributors to the tool set has become known as Six Sigma included John Lupienski, Dr. Harry, Mike Carnell, and Mario Perez-Wilson. Mario was the first to actually put course materials to it. Bill’s contribution was the linkage of reliability to rework and it was very cool that the Comm Sector scrapped boards rather than reworking them when they hit a 95% yield and could prove it was ultimately a cost savings. Bill was also hung up of the width of the t distribution for samples of 4. It takes stats, which I know you don’t do, but it’s easy to figure out how this was really the origin of the 1.5 shift.

    You also said – “We all are proudly showing his work in our credentials and making money off Six Sigma”

    This is also false. Bill’s work are not your credentials, they are exclusively the credentials of Bill.

    You earlier said you guarantee 90% reduction without stats. This is also nonsense as it can’t be done across an enterprise. You may get it in a pocket like a back office operation but that’s all.

    Praveen, you would do well to stop embarrassing yourself. There are too many people on here that are real that were there contributing.

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    #192909

    Thomas Whitney
    Member

    @Mike-Carnell I don’t know. I watched the Juran 12 set tapes we had in Seguin 3 times and all the Harry tapes (don’t remember how many) on stats several times. Juran was tough, I think he was 90 when he made them. Harry was young with brown hair and was OK. Just the thought of watching a John tape makes me want to laser myself. I love John but he is the most monotone slow speaking person I know based on how he spoke during the must have been 50 quality surveys on which I went with him. I think I would try if I drank a dozen of John’s favorite drink, the Manhattan. No, make that 15…

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    #192911

    Mike Carnell
    Participant

    @twhitney It was painful. If I think to much about all that time I spent watching those tapes I get a little teary eyed (maybe a touch suicidal). I did Juran and those were good.

    Check out the Mike Harry tapes with his little sidekick wearing lipstick.

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    #192912

    Gary Cone
    Participant

    Hey Mike’s tapes were worth watching just to learn about the ShopSmith of Statistical Tools.

    The little twerp with the lipstick was pretty funny too.

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    #192917

    MBBinWI
    Participant

    @garyacone – anyone have a copy that can be posted on youtube?

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    #192941

    Chris Seider
    Participant

    @garyacone and @Mike-Carnell Are there videos of you guys–it would be a hoot to see!

    And to the one who should remember this line of thinking….”The grasshopper has learned to leave less prints on the rice paper”.

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