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VSM Implementation

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  • #40667

    Wagh
    Participant

    Hi forum,
    i have a simple Q, (especially to those who have involved in the VSM projects),
    as far as implementing VSM is concerned, is proper training necessary or info thru’ books & i net are sufficient? since i feel comfortable to start the project from whatevr info i,ve got thru latter (i.e. books & i-net)
    regards
    Prasad
     
     

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    #126743

    Tronan
    Member

    Hi,
    I am guessing that the person that first drew a VSM thought the same thing. Do I have it right yet? or shall I use it anyways?
    Go for it, if you have any issues when you are using it, post them on here. I would recommend that you map a simple process first so as to get used to drawing them, also, use post-it notes and a wall, or a pencil or something, I’ve had to alter every map I’ve drawn to date…. They are never totally right first time.
    Good luck!
    T.

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    #126744

    Srinivas
    Member

    Hi Prasad,
    If I take VSM for Value Stream Mapping I would attempt to answer your question. Your understanding levels of VSM are more important than how you acquired this knowledge. You may not need a formal training on VSM, but remember there are lot of tools of Lean & Six Sigma to be used while carrying out this project. I typically used tools like cycle time, takt time, pipe line chart, kanban, Time Value Map (TVM) etc in my projects related to VSM. I do not think you can understand  these tools and put them to thier best use unless you are trained. It is always advisable you get trained/do it under the mentorship of some one who did it earlier.
    Best of Luck
    Srinivas

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    #126745

    Tronan
    Member

    Hi Srinivas,
    Just wondering, what is a time value map?
    T.

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    #127040

    senthilvasan
    Member

    Hi Prasad,
    Like any other tool, VSM can be perfected with practice.
    I would suggest that you have go at the Books “Learning to see ” by John Shook or “Seeing the Whole” by Womack.
    I feel you can start doing the Map & you will be much better off after two or three cycles.
    A word of caution:
    Try to develop a macro VSM first and perfect till you get a grasp of  VSM Symbols , their usage , Demand Amplification etc.., then go for detailed mapping. ( If you are mapping  a non-manufacturing Value Stream , the the above rigidly holds true!).
    All the best , please keep us posted about your progress!
    Bye
    Senthil
     
     
     

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    #129360

    Wagh
    Participant

    Hi forum-ites,
    First of all thank you Senthil…’Learning to see’ by Rothers & Shook ‘shook’ me with its simple & illustrative matter, it really is an excellent source i must say…to start with especially,
    thanks for u’r msg srinivas, u can assume that i have a ‘little bit’ of theoretical knowledge on my subject…i know its a virtuous sea out there…!
    how r u doin’ Mr T ?…
    Current state mapping should take no more than 2 days the most important here would be future state map & its implementation i guess…
    here is another descent book, by Pascal called “Lean Manufacturing Simplified” which i’m currently refering for my future vsm project,
    thank u for replying …i’ll be back… while my co. tries to take a lean leap!
     
     
     

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    #129361

    Wagh
    Participant

    Hi T
    Tried few case studies from book ‘learning to see’ seems simple…but the fact remains that simple things are difficult to implement!
    any source for more case studies?…i’ll settle with books & inet than for official training…i’m feeling more comfortable now

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    #129384

    Tronan
    Member

    Hi Prasad,
    Great to hear that you are having a go! Sometimes, when it seems simple, it is!
    I would recommend trying it out on a process at work. Then if you want, send the map over to me and I’ll check that you have drawn it correctly. Look at the core reason for drawing a VSM… To gain a new perspective on a value stream that you think you already know everything about. I use the VSM for the following:

    Creating a picture of a process from customer to customer, as the perceived version and the real version are seldom similar and usually need proved, this usually reduces an opposing argument to change to a very short conversation.
    Identifying areas for improvement be it large, medium or small for BB, GB, Kaizen Events or just do it!
    A record of the current state before and after a major project to show evolution.
    Sometimes you have to jump in and have a go. Every time you do a case study, you are only adding value to your perception not the bottom line.
    Good Luck
    T.
     
     

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    #129395

    Wagh
    Participant

    Thanks for u’r needful advice. I realize it’s not as easy, i’ll need sometime to understand the complete process oncemore before i can even officially initialize the whole project.
    started with selecting a product group…since its a high mix-low volume scenario…getting track of the machine details (%uptime) is going to be the toughest
    i’ll have to form a team & train them first. i’ve already collected a huge amt of matl. for the training, right now working on the ppt.
    i still sometimes feel change management is the most vital for any new implementation! 

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    #129411

    Tronan
    Member

    Hi Prasad,
    No worries, One thing though, mapping a high mix low volume is a bit on the tricky side if it is your first real map. I would recommend that you pick the highest runner at first and map that. The option is a generic map that groups the product type, this can desensitise your results as you are not using specific times…. Make the call based on the level of detail you want to get from it.
    Also, on the % Uptime, this can be a bit misleading as a machine could be down but not needed. Go for a metric called OEE and put that data into the process boxes on the VSM instead of pure uptime or down time.
    I’ve been having a bit of an arguement over the whole change management and I have come to a conclusion; making the physical change and doing what is necessary to improve a process or procedure is a walk in the park. Changing the people who interact with the improvement is the majority of the work and is therefore the hard part.
    Good luck sir
    T.

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