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What is an opportunity?

Six Sigma – iSixSigma Forums Old Forums General What is an opportunity?

This topic contains 18 replies, has 13 voices, and was last updated by  Mikel 12 years, 6 months ago.

Viewing 19 posts - 1 through 19 (of 19 total)
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  • #46462

    Rakesh
    Participant

    What is an opportunity? I had understood opportunity as the “no. of chances where an error can be committed in a process”. For ex: If we are producing a unit of say “x” product & if the product has 5 steps which involves manual intervention, then those 5 steps can be counted as opportunities to commit error. However I came across another definition on this site- “An opportunity is the lowest defect noticeable by a customer”.
    Would like to know if there is any standard definition or is it case specific.
    Regards,

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    #153602

    Chris Seider
    Participant

    An opportunity is the opportunity to add value without including rework.  The process step which has an opportunity must have a physical transformation of the product or service……or else value could not have been added. 
     

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    #153613

    sureshkumar
    Member

    Rakesh,
    My view on this:
    No. of possible chances for a defect to happen in the process.
    Defect means ” Anything leads to Customer Dis Satisfaction.
    Customer Means ” both Internal and External Customers “

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    #153693

    Mike Carnell
    Participant

    rakesh,
    Chris gave you the correct answer but let me see if I can maybe clarify something. Stop thinking defects. It is the number of times to do it correctly. If I am assembling a bolt and a nut I get 1 opportunity for getting the correct bolt, one opportunity for the correct nut and one opportunity for the assembly so a total of three. If I can think of 3 ways that the nut can go on the bold incorrectly it DOES NOT raise the count to 5.
    Just my opinion.

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    #153694

    Nag
    Participant

    Hi Rakesh,
    Opportunity is defined as chance of making things right or wrong.
    If you have 5 process steps for a product , and if you take 5 opportunities and compute the sigma level , which may give you wrong picture w.r.t to what is really happening.
    I suggest, irrespective of the no.of process steps for a product , consider opportunity as 1 because for the customer the product is meeting his specs or not. If you compute sigma level using taking opportunity as 1 will give u the real picture .
    Regards
    Nag

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    #153696

    Mike Carnell
    Participant

    Nag,
    That is pure nonsense.

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    #153700

    Allthingsidiot
    Participant

    Agree

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    #153702

    Mike Carnell
    Participant

    Thank you.

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    #153732

    Sayyed
    Participant

    While I agree with Mike Carnell on his definition of oppourtunity; I think what Nag is trying to say here is while measuring accuracy of a process use DPr or Defective Proportionate and not DPU or DPO – because for the customer even if the unit has one defect the entire unit is defective. And since, a product or process has one opportunity to be perfect the number of opportunity is 1. In other words : go the attribute way when you measure customer-touching process.
    It may not give you the granularity that a DPU or DPO gives you but will surely provide you a picture on Customer Satisfaction.
    Measure Quality from Customer’s perspective.

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    #153736

    Mike Carnell
    Participant

    Neal,
    If I am measuring opportunities when I ship out the back door I can live with one opportunity per unit since, as you say from the customer perspective, it is a good one or a bad one.
    When I am working on the inside of a process there is more involved than just a customers perspective of quality. I may want to know where the opportunities are for one reason or another but not for project level work. At the project level we are going to run on dpu because we want a metric that is sensitive enough to see the result of improvements we have made.
    If you take that one defect per unit view inside a factory and you have 2 factories – one makes light bulbs and one makes engines for the 777 and each have 1 opportunity you have lost any understanding of the complexity of the product. At that point the metric is pointless.
    Just my opinion.

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    #153755

    Sayyed
    Participant

    I have to agree with you, Mike….Thanks for the perspective.
    – Neal.

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    #153768

    Mike Carnell
    Participant

    Neal,
    You are welcome.
    Regards

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    #153816

    Nag
    Participant

    Hi Mike,
    The answer nonsense shows  no common sense.
    What do u say if u make engine 777 consider  high no.of opportunities because of complex product having more operations and then calculate DPMO and then say that ur process is at a certain sigma level which in reality may not be and trying to bluff customer as well as ur own organization…
    If we are trying to magnify the opportunities more than 10 for any product and calculate sigma level which will be absurd and trying to bluff urself.
    Be honest while deciding the opportunities… otherwise it gives u totally wrong picture…
    Regards
    Nag

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    #153820

    Cone
    Participant

    Nag,
    You don’t understand the reasons for counting opportunities. It certainly is not to fool anyone. Opportunites are strictly an management tool to know where to go learn and where to apply resources. Nothing more.

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    #153824

    NpBB
    Participant

    Nag….you are becoming one at this point.

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    #153831

    Ron
    Member

    I can see from the rash of poor responses that you have touched on a topic of considerable ingnorance.
    Your first response was the best, however, I will caution you on the misues of “opportunity” count. Obviously games can be played by bumping up the opportunity count your sigma levels goes up and nothing has been done to improve the product.
    The best methodology is to baseline a method for counting opportunities and stay with it. When I was with Allied Signal we used 3X the bill of material as a baseline and stuck with it. It actually drove the correct behaviours to improve the productline.
    What ever you come up with the agreement among your team must be to lock it in for ever more and run with it.
     
    Hope this helps
     

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    #154156

    lin
    Participant

    I am glad you fellows came up with the simple definition of “opportunity”.
    Now I am really confused?
    For us (I may be the only one reading that is not a
    Six Sigma engineer)just starting out, I take what I am reading as opportunity is an event in which either conformance or non-conformance can be added to the realization of a product. The more opportunities it takes to reach conformance to customer satisfaction, the more waste. The goal is the fewest possible.
    Now you can go back and talk “baselining”.

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    #154157

    accrington
    Participant

    “ …opportunity is missed by most people because it is dressed in overalls and looks like work ”
    Thomas Edison (1847-1931)
    Sitting around debating what an opportunity is, or percentages in the extreme tails of perfectly normal distributions, and other metaphysics is much less taxing than actually working to understand and improve process, product and service.

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    #154161

    Mikel
    Member

    Hear, hear

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