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Topic When Lean Is H-A-R-D

When Lean Is H-A-R-D

Home Forums General Forums Implementation When Lean Is H-A-R-D

This topic contains 4 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by  Ahiru-san 1 week, 2 days ago.

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  • #698977 Reply

    My company is doing so many “Lean” things: Quality circles with root cause analysis; monthly supervisor-lead kaizen events; monthly company-wide quality meetings, weekly Lean training videos and more. Everybody knows the lingo, but few people are willing to reveal problems, look for root causes and do the often tedious work of fully implementing an improvement in the real world. It seems to be something subtle, something internal, so …

    … how can we figure out what we are doing wrong?

    #698984 Reply

    Think about organizational culture. Many lean implementations fail to deliver results when they are focused solely on the application of the tools. If your organizational culture is not open to lean methodology then no matter how many tools you implement you will never realize the benefits. Start looking into why you are on this journey. Two suggested readings : Start with Why by Simon Sinek and Switch by Chip Heath. These may help

    #698986 Reply

    GEMBA.

    Also, you need some experienced folks who can see problems that others can’t see.

    @Mike-Carnell is a great purveyor.

    #699086 Reply

    Successful Lean involves a long-term respectful, problem-solving culture. Many more fail than are successful. Keep in mind it took Toyota over 30 years to develop their culture before anyone started paying attention to them. Today, Toyota has been at it for well over 60 years and many at Toyota will tell you they are just starting.

    To reinvigorate your effort, you might want to study the Toyota Production System rather than Lean. 40 Years, 20 Million Ideas: The Toyota Suggestion System by Yuzo Yasuda might be a start. Yasuda describes how Toyota used their employees to drive their kaizen/continuous improvement process. Mondren and Ohno have published some good books on TPS but they don’t tell you “how” like Yasuda does. Similarly, Shingo is a great source to learn about tools but not the culture. As for Western authors, Liker does a decent job with his first book The Toyota Way. I personally don’t think Liker’s subsequent books are nearly as helpful. If you’re close to a Toyota plant, take a tour. In addition to Toyota, you might learn about Danaher and Milliken. Unfortunately, there’s not much written on either of the latter systems.

    @sweylie mentioned Sinek’s Start with Why. I like the book as well but I use it more for leadership training. Sinek has a great video on TED that will give you an overview of his thoughts RE starting with why.

    #699088 Reply

    Great book suggestions folks! I will start with the Kindle edition of “Switch.” Hey, for #2.00, you can’t go wrong! Thanks to all.

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