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Kaizen Blitz

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  • #41744

    Gabrielle
    Participant

    Has anyone had any experience using the Kaizen Blitz concept.  Please share your experience.

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    #131221

    annon
    Participant

    Sure…what do you want to know?

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    #131225

    Gabrielle
    Participant

    What was your experience?  Was it successful?  Were you able to get !00% uninterrupted participation, that included management?  My understanding is that this event is like an intense Quick Win Analysis session that is held over a 3 to 5 day period.  It requires the decision makers to be in the session and at completion solutions are identified, evaluated and implemented. 

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    #131228

    Anirvan Sen
    Participant

    Gabrielle, Your understanding is correct. What we have done in GE is that we have used a more generic Kaizen Blitz approach for LEAN workouts.
    Cheers,
    A.

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    #131230

    Gabrielle
    Participant

    Generic meaning not as robust?  How is what you’re doing more than a typical Quick Win analysis but less than a full scale Kaizen?

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    #131238

    thevillageidiot
    Member

    Don’t read too much into it…Kaizen simply means to take apart and make whole (paraphrasing)…You essentially sacrifice accuracy for speed…your takeaways are geared toward a 30-50% range and your time frame is generally between 2-5 working days.  GE uses a WORKOUT format that is similar in form and function to great effect……If is best deployed when the problem well known and no new knowledge is required to solve the problem…such as bureaucratic barriers or VSM type work…..Pmap the process, ensure full representation of the process by selecting the proper team members (3-7 usually0, select a method to drive the event (VSM, Problem Analysis, etc)
    The takeaway from the session is an action plan with proposed solutions, risk management actions, time lines, owners, and expected results…an FMEA-like device if you will. You don’t do the work in the Kaizen, you plan the work….Your action plan is the deliverable that leads you through implementation….great tool for any organization, esp. ones new to quality.
    Just my opinion.  Good luck.

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    #131239

    BTDT
    Participant

    Gabrielle:This is a good reference for the way to conduct a WORKOUT – GE style.http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/0071384162/202-0262014-5291815Cheers, BTDT

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    #131240

    Sig
    Member

      Our company does Kaizen events frequently.  What we refer to as a Kaizen blitz, be it correct or not, is when we take a cross-functional team, spend a day of training on lean, a day of training on 7 wastes, and work on a project that was picked by engineering, quality and production management.  Sometimes we combine sequences and the focus is highly lean, other-times we walk the process of a cell or line and evaluate what problems or opportunities for improvement exist and use the new tools to implement the changes.  3 days are spent implementing changes, establishing new standard work, takt times etc. training others and presenting to management.  works pretty well and keeps the Kaizen atmosphere of “eliminating Muda” quite alive on the floor.  all in all the event is a week long, 1.5 to 2 days of training, 3-3.5 days of activity.  Like I mentioned above, we might call it something, but perhaps it isn’t, but that’s just the way our company does it, and it works well.  

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    #131244

    Adam L Bowden
    Participant

    All,
    All of you point towards the power of Blitzes.  There are primarily 3 type of blitzes from my perspective:
    1) the full on 5 day version driving Lean (new and trained team members)
    2) the 1 or 2 day version driving lean (trained team members – or smaller scale events)
    3) usage of the kaizen philosophy to drive lean, Six Sigma projects, DFSS etc etc
    Lets not forget Kaikaku also as the precursor to Kaizen.
    The power of this method is in locking folks in a room and not letting them out until they have figured it out or implemented the changes.  It revolves around empowerment, training/understanding, teamwork and most importantly a “culture shift”.
    For those that “fail to plan” the event will “plan to fail”.  A significant amount of prework and communication is required and also without senior Leadership buy in/support it is also doomed to failure.
    Kaikaku, Kaizen. CAP or workouts are fundamental and MUST be used in conjunction with SS to show accelerated results.  Leadership are typically dismayed with SS because it takes TOO LONG to get results.  Acceleration methods work and are key to changing the culture for the better.  Remembering that 65% of all SS deployments fail and that it’s 20% tools success and 80% cultural success – I’ve got to bet that there is a strong correlation between SS failure and “time to get results”.
    Any way – that’s my 2c worth for tonight.
    Adam

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    #131266

    Super Intelligent
    Member

    Have you  received  practical  solutions?Can  you  give  some  examples?What  type  of  difficulties  have  you  faced ?How  many  persons  you  have  involved?cross-functional  or  from  the  same  department?Was  it  enough  time (3-5 days)  to  perform  the  required  job?What  type  of  problem have  you  tackled :Eng.,Commercial,ADM.?Have  you  included  the  5Ss Campaign,TPM….etc?Thanks 

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    #131277

    Charles H.
    Participant

    I couldn’t let this pass.  Kaizen deliverables are not plans, they are action and results oriented, based upon well defined mandates.  Properly ochestrated and planned for, they will deliver dramatic results in the early stages as the waste is removed from the system.  Ultimately, they will get smaller results, but all improvement are good. I have seen a Blitz reduce defects by 100% (mistake proofing / poka yoke), reduce lead and/or cycle times by 75% or more, and save well  over $1,000,000 on an annualized basis.  As Adam said – the planning before the event is critical.  Research Fruedenberg NOK and Danaher.  They have done quite well. 

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    #131295

    Super Intelligent
    Member

    Please  explain  briefly  what suppose to  be  done  in  each  day (1———–5),thanks

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    #131302

    Charles H.
    Participant

    Generally, days one and two are putting a plan together to implement, and days three through five are implementation and final report out preparation.  Two critical success factors are the up front planning and communication, and proper scoping of the event mandate for action. 
    An approach that I find to work quite well, based upon the Pratt & Whitney model, is that a daily briefing is held each day with all of senior management in attendence – their attendance is mandatory if they are in-plant.  Managmenet cannot disempower the team(s) by telling them “do this, do that” (their issues should be handled off-line with the team facilitator and team leader).  They can ask questions like “did you consider this . . .” but they cannot take a directive role with the team(s).
    I prefer the train/do approach, not broad brush training over the first day or two and then go do it.  Teach a tool, use a tool, then move on.  One of my objectives when running a Kaizen Blitz is to prevent the team(s) from following each other around like a bunch of little ducklings following the mother duck.  Get the team leader to a point where they must multi-task and delegate specific tasks to the team members.  I also do not allow for a bunch of “we’ll do that later” Kaizen Newspaper issues.  If it cannot be done during the event, the event was most likely not properly scoped or planned for.
    A knowledgeable and capable facilitator can run two teams concurrently
    As an aside, and one of great concern to me, is the current misunderstanding and misuse of the VSM.  In most cases, it has become nothing more than a process worker based process map with cycle time, etc. type metrics applied to it.  It is a management tool to understand the system and to develop their plan for system / value stream improvement. One powerful combination is the partitioning of the cost of waste and cost of poor quality per the seven wastes with the VSM.  This is how one client was able to discover over $36 million of waste within four of their value streams.  Very powerful stuff.

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    #144110

    Marlon Brando
    Participant

    very  important  point  of  view

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    #144111

    Marlon Brando
    Participant

    To  be  honest  I  believe  KB is  a  big  “show-off” without big  value  in  real practical cases.It  was  misused by many  pretenders to  make  quick business.May  be  the  Japanese  have  achieved  some  results ,but  that  is  all?

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